Ole Bækgaard Nielsen

The Na+,K+ pump and muscle excitability

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The Na+,K+ pump and muscle excitability. / Clausen, T; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard; Harrison, A P; Flatman, J A; Overgaard, Kristian.

In: Acta Physiologica (Print), Vol. 162, No. 3, 1998, p. 183-90.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Clausen, T, Nielsen, OB, Harrison, AP, Flatman, JA & Overgaard, K 1998, 'The Na+,K+ pump and muscle excitability', Acta Physiologica (Print), vol. 162, no. 3, pp. 183-90.

APA

Clausen, T., Nielsen, O. B., Harrison, A. P., Flatman, J. A., & Overgaard, K. (1998). The Na+,K+ pump and muscle excitability. Acta Physiologica (Print), 162(3), 183-90.

CBE

Clausen T, Nielsen OB, Harrison AP, Flatman JA, Overgaard K. 1998. The Na+,K+ pump and muscle excitability. Acta Physiologica (Print). 162(3):183-90.

MLA

Clausen, T et al. "The Na+,K+ pump and muscle excitability". Acta Physiologica (Print). 1998, 162(3). 183-90.

Vancouver

Clausen T, Nielsen OB, Harrison AP, Flatman JA, Overgaard K. The Na+,K+ pump and muscle excitability. Acta Physiologica (Print). 1998;162(3):183-90.

Author

Clausen, T ; Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard ; Harrison, A P ; Flatman, J A ; Overgaard, Kristian. / The Na+,K+ pump and muscle excitability. In: Acta Physiologica (Print). 1998 ; Vol. 162, No. 3. pp. 183-90.

Bibtex

@article{f2ec23a0f92d11de9c17000ea68e967b,
title = "The Na+,K+ pump and muscle excitability",
abstract = "In most types of mammalian skeletal muscles the total concentration of Na+,K+ pumps is 0.2-0.8 nmol g wet wt(-1). At rest, only around 5% of these Na+,K+ pumps are active, but during high-frequency stimulation, virtually all Na+,K+ pumps may be called into action within a few seconds. Despite this large capacity for active Na+,K+ transport, excitation often induces a net loss of K+, a net gain of Na+, depolarization and ensuing loss of excitability. In muscles exposed to high [K+]o or low [Na+]o, alone or combined, excitability is reduced. Under these conditions, hormonal or excitation-induced stimulation of the Na+,K+ pump leads to considerable force recovery. This recovery can be blocked by ouabain and seems to be the result of Na+,K+ pump induced hyperpolarization and restoration of Na+,K+ gradients. In muscles where the capacity of the Na+,K+ pump is reduced, the decline in the force developing during continuous electrical stimulation (30-90 Hz) is accelerated and the subsequent force recovery considerably delayed. The loss of endurance is significant within a few seconds after the onset of stimulation. Increased concentration of Na+ channels or open-time of Na+ channels is also associated with reduced endurance and impairment of force recovery. This indicates that during contractile activity, excitability is acutely dependent on the ratio between Na+ entry and Na+,K+ pump capacity. Contrary to previous assumptions, the Na+,K+ pump, due to rapid activation of its large transport capacity seems to play a dynamic role in the from second to second ongoing restoration and maintenance of excitability in working skeletal muscle.",
keywords = "Animals, Humans, Muscle Contraction, Muscle, Skeletal, Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase",
author = "T Clausen and Nielsen, {Ole B{\ae}kgaard} and Harrison, {A P} and Flatman, {J A} and Kristian Overgaard",
year = "1998",
language = "English",
volume = "162",
pages = "183--90",
journal = "Acta Physiologica (Print)",
issn = "1748-1708",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Na+,K+ pump and muscle excitability

AU - Clausen, T

AU - Nielsen, Ole Bækgaard

AU - Harrison, A P

AU - Flatman, J A

AU - Overgaard, Kristian

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - In most types of mammalian skeletal muscles the total concentration of Na+,K+ pumps is 0.2-0.8 nmol g wet wt(-1). At rest, only around 5% of these Na+,K+ pumps are active, but during high-frequency stimulation, virtually all Na+,K+ pumps may be called into action within a few seconds. Despite this large capacity for active Na+,K+ transport, excitation often induces a net loss of K+, a net gain of Na+, depolarization and ensuing loss of excitability. In muscles exposed to high [K+]o or low [Na+]o, alone or combined, excitability is reduced. Under these conditions, hormonal or excitation-induced stimulation of the Na+,K+ pump leads to considerable force recovery. This recovery can be blocked by ouabain and seems to be the result of Na+,K+ pump induced hyperpolarization and restoration of Na+,K+ gradients. In muscles where the capacity of the Na+,K+ pump is reduced, the decline in the force developing during continuous electrical stimulation (30-90 Hz) is accelerated and the subsequent force recovery considerably delayed. The loss of endurance is significant within a few seconds after the onset of stimulation. Increased concentration of Na+ channels or open-time of Na+ channels is also associated with reduced endurance and impairment of force recovery. This indicates that during contractile activity, excitability is acutely dependent on the ratio between Na+ entry and Na+,K+ pump capacity. Contrary to previous assumptions, the Na+,K+ pump, due to rapid activation of its large transport capacity seems to play a dynamic role in the from second to second ongoing restoration and maintenance of excitability in working skeletal muscle.

AB - In most types of mammalian skeletal muscles the total concentration of Na+,K+ pumps is 0.2-0.8 nmol g wet wt(-1). At rest, only around 5% of these Na+,K+ pumps are active, but during high-frequency stimulation, virtually all Na+,K+ pumps may be called into action within a few seconds. Despite this large capacity for active Na+,K+ transport, excitation often induces a net loss of K+, a net gain of Na+, depolarization and ensuing loss of excitability. In muscles exposed to high [K+]o or low [Na+]o, alone or combined, excitability is reduced. Under these conditions, hormonal or excitation-induced stimulation of the Na+,K+ pump leads to considerable force recovery. This recovery can be blocked by ouabain and seems to be the result of Na+,K+ pump induced hyperpolarization and restoration of Na+,K+ gradients. In muscles where the capacity of the Na+,K+ pump is reduced, the decline in the force developing during continuous electrical stimulation (30-90 Hz) is accelerated and the subsequent force recovery considerably delayed. The loss of endurance is significant within a few seconds after the onset of stimulation. Increased concentration of Na+ channels or open-time of Na+ channels is also associated with reduced endurance and impairment of force recovery. This indicates that during contractile activity, excitability is acutely dependent on the ratio between Na+ entry and Na+,K+ pump capacity. Contrary to previous assumptions, the Na+,K+ pump, due to rapid activation of its large transport capacity seems to play a dynamic role in the from second to second ongoing restoration and maintenance of excitability in working skeletal muscle.

KW - Animals

KW - Humans

KW - Muscle Contraction

KW - Muscle, Skeletal

KW - Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 9578364

VL - 162

SP - 183

EP - 190

JO - Acta Physiologica (Print)

JF - Acta Physiologica (Print)

SN - 1748-1708

IS - 3

ER -