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Mogens Agerbo Krogh

Latent class evaluation of a milk test, a urine test, and the fat-to-protein percentage ratio in milk to diagnose ketosis in dairy cows

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Latent class evaluation of a milk test, a urine test, and the fat-to-protein percentage ratio in milk to diagnose ketosis in dairy cows. / Krogh, Mogens Agerbo; Toft, Niels; Enevoldsen, Carsten.

In: Journal of Dairy Science, Vol. 94, No. 5, 2011, p. 2360–2367.

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Krogh, Mogens Agerbo ; Toft, Niels ; Enevoldsen, Carsten. / Latent class evaluation of a milk test, a urine test, and the fat-to-protein percentage ratio in milk to diagnose ketosis in dairy cows. In: Journal of Dairy Science. 2011 ; Vol. 94, No. 5. pp. 2360–2367.

Bibtex

@article{69bde9593bc74590922e978956d04934,
title = "Latent class evaluation of a milk test, a urine test, and the fat-to-protein percentage ratio in milk to diagnose ketosis in dairy cows",
abstract = "In this study, 3 commonly used tests to diagnose ketosis were evaluated with a latent class model to avoid the assumption of an available perfect test. The 3 tests were the KetoLac BHB (Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co. Ltd., Nagoya, Japan) test strip that tests milk for β-hydroxybutyrate, the KetoStix (Bayer Diagnostics Europe Ltd., Dublin, Ireland) test strip that tests urine for acetoacetate, and the fat-to-protein percentage ratio (FPR) in milk. A total of 8,902 cows were included in the analysis. The cows were considered to be a random sample from the population of Danish dairy cattle under intensive management, thus representing a natural spectrum of ketosis as a disease. All cows had a recorded FPR between 7 and 21 d postpartum. The KetoLac BHB recordings were available from 2,257 cows and 6,645 cows had a KetoStix recording. The recordings were analyzed with a modified Hui-Walter model, in a Bayesian framework. The specificity of the KetoLac BHB test and the KetoStix test were both high [0.99 (0.97–0.99)], whereas the specificity of FPR was somewhat lower [0.79 (0.77–0.81)]. The best sensitivity was for the KetoStix test [0.78 (0.55–0.98)], followed by the FPR [0.63 (0.58–0.71)] and KetoLac BHB test [0.58 (0.35–0.93)].",
author = "Krogh, {Mogens Agerbo} and Niels Toft and Carsten Enevoldsen",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.3168/jds.2010-3816",
language = "English",
volume = "94",
pages = "2360–2367",
journal = "Journal of Dairy Science",
issn = "0022-0302",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Latent class evaluation of a milk test, a urine test, and the fat-to-protein percentage ratio in milk to diagnose ketosis in dairy cows

AU - Krogh, Mogens Agerbo

AU - Toft, Niels

AU - Enevoldsen, Carsten

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - In this study, 3 commonly used tests to diagnose ketosis were evaluated with a latent class model to avoid the assumption of an available perfect test. The 3 tests were the KetoLac BHB (Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co. Ltd., Nagoya, Japan) test strip that tests milk for β-hydroxybutyrate, the KetoStix (Bayer Diagnostics Europe Ltd., Dublin, Ireland) test strip that tests urine for acetoacetate, and the fat-to-protein percentage ratio (FPR) in milk. A total of 8,902 cows were included in the analysis. The cows were considered to be a random sample from the population of Danish dairy cattle under intensive management, thus representing a natural spectrum of ketosis as a disease. All cows had a recorded FPR between 7 and 21 d postpartum. The KetoLac BHB recordings were available from 2,257 cows and 6,645 cows had a KetoStix recording. The recordings were analyzed with a modified Hui-Walter model, in a Bayesian framework. The specificity of the KetoLac BHB test and the KetoStix test were both high [0.99 (0.97–0.99)], whereas the specificity of FPR was somewhat lower [0.79 (0.77–0.81)]. The best sensitivity was for the KetoStix test [0.78 (0.55–0.98)], followed by the FPR [0.63 (0.58–0.71)] and KetoLac BHB test [0.58 (0.35–0.93)].

AB - In this study, 3 commonly used tests to diagnose ketosis were evaluated with a latent class model to avoid the assumption of an available perfect test. The 3 tests were the KetoLac BHB (Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co. Ltd., Nagoya, Japan) test strip that tests milk for β-hydroxybutyrate, the KetoStix (Bayer Diagnostics Europe Ltd., Dublin, Ireland) test strip that tests urine for acetoacetate, and the fat-to-protein percentage ratio (FPR) in milk. A total of 8,902 cows were included in the analysis. The cows were considered to be a random sample from the population of Danish dairy cattle under intensive management, thus representing a natural spectrum of ketosis as a disease. All cows had a recorded FPR between 7 and 21 d postpartum. The KetoLac BHB recordings were available from 2,257 cows and 6,645 cows had a KetoStix recording. The recordings were analyzed with a modified Hui-Walter model, in a Bayesian framework. The specificity of the KetoLac BHB test and the KetoStix test were both high [0.99 (0.97–0.99)], whereas the specificity of FPR was somewhat lower [0.79 (0.77–0.81)]. The best sensitivity was for the KetoStix test [0.78 (0.55–0.98)], followed by the FPR [0.63 (0.58–0.71)] and KetoLac BHB test [0.58 (0.35–0.93)].

U2 - 10.3168/jds.2010-3816

DO - 10.3168/jds.2010-3816

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21524525

VL - 94

SP - 2360

EP - 2367

JO - Journal of Dairy Science

JF - Journal of Dairy Science

SN - 0022-0302

IS - 5

ER -