Michael Freeman

An evaluation of applied biomechanics as an adjunct to systematic specific causation in forensic medicine

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An evaluation of applied biomechanics as an adjunct to systematic specific causation in forensic medicine. / Freeman, M.D.; Kohles, S.S.

In: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift, Vol. 161, No. 19-20, 01.10.2011, p. 458-468.

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Freeman, M.D. ; Kohles, S.S. / An evaluation of applied biomechanics as an adjunct to systematic specific causation in forensic medicine. In: Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift. 2011 ; Vol. 161, No. 19-20. pp. 458-468.

Bibtex

@article{b869ca53b37844de92b3ab8bcd54bd3d,
title = "An evaluation of applied biomechanics as an adjunct to systematic specific causation in forensic medicine",
abstract = "Biomechanical tests of post hoc probability have been proposed by prior authors as reliable tests of causation in forensic settings. Biomechanical assessment of injury kinetics and kinematics is a potentially important tool in forensic medicine, but there is also the potential for misapplication. The most reliable application is when biomechanical analysis is used to explain injury mechanisms, such as how an injury may have occurred. When a biomechanical analysis is used as a means of determining whether, rather than how an injury has resulted from a traumatic exposure, then a lack of reliability of the methodology limits its application in forensic medicine. Herein, we describe a systematic assessment of causation by adapting established general causation principles to specific causation scenarios, and how biomechanical analysis of injury mechanics is properly used to augment such an approach in conjunction with the principles of forensic epidemiology. An example calculation of relative risk associated with cervical spine injury is provided as a representative probabilistic metric for assessing causation. The statistical benefits and limitations of biomechanical analysis are discussed as an adjunct to forensic medicine.",
author = "M.D. Freeman and S.S. Kohles",
note = "MEDLINE{\textregistered} is the source for the MeSH terms of this document.",
year = "2011",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10354-011-0909-3",
language = "English",
volume = "161",
pages = "458--468",
journal = "Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift",
issn = "0043-5341",
publisher = "Springer Wien",
number = "19-20",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - An evaluation of applied biomechanics as an adjunct to systematic specific causation in forensic medicine

AU - Freeman, M.D.

AU - Kohles, S.S.

N1 - MEDLINE® is the source for the MeSH terms of this document.

PY - 2011/10/1

Y1 - 2011/10/1

N2 - Biomechanical tests of post hoc probability have been proposed by prior authors as reliable tests of causation in forensic settings. Biomechanical assessment of injury kinetics and kinematics is a potentially important tool in forensic medicine, but there is also the potential for misapplication. The most reliable application is when biomechanical analysis is used to explain injury mechanisms, such as how an injury may have occurred. When a biomechanical analysis is used as a means of determining whether, rather than how an injury has resulted from a traumatic exposure, then a lack of reliability of the methodology limits its application in forensic medicine. Herein, we describe a systematic assessment of causation by adapting established general causation principles to specific causation scenarios, and how biomechanical analysis of injury mechanics is properly used to augment such an approach in conjunction with the principles of forensic epidemiology. An example calculation of relative risk associated with cervical spine injury is provided as a representative probabilistic metric for assessing causation. The statistical benefits and limitations of biomechanical analysis are discussed as an adjunct to forensic medicine.

AB - Biomechanical tests of post hoc probability have been proposed by prior authors as reliable tests of causation in forensic settings. Biomechanical assessment of injury kinetics and kinematics is a potentially important tool in forensic medicine, but there is also the potential for misapplication. The most reliable application is when biomechanical analysis is used to explain injury mechanisms, such as how an injury may have occurred. When a biomechanical analysis is used as a means of determining whether, rather than how an injury has resulted from a traumatic exposure, then a lack of reliability of the methodology limits its application in forensic medicine. Herein, we describe a systematic assessment of causation by adapting established general causation principles to specific causation scenarios, and how biomechanical analysis of injury mechanics is properly used to augment such an approach in conjunction with the principles of forensic epidemiology. An example calculation of relative risk associated with cervical spine injury is provided as a representative probabilistic metric for assessing causation. The statistical benefits and limitations of biomechanical analysis are discussed as an adjunct to forensic medicine.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=83655201444&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10354-011-0909-3

DO - 10.1007/s10354-011-0909-3

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21792525

AN - SCOPUS:83655201444

VL - 161

SP - 458

EP - 468

JO - Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift

JF - Wiener Medizinische Wochenschrift

SN - 0043-5341

IS - 19-20

ER -