The Danish Centre for Studies in Research and Research Policy

Maxime Sainte-Marie

Beyond funding: Acknowledgement patterns in biomedical, natural and social sciences

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Adèle Paul-Hus, École de Bibliothéconomie et des Sciences de l'Information, Canada Research Chair on the Transformations of Scholarly Communication, Canada
  • Adrián A. Díaz-Faes, CSIC-UPV - Institute for Innovation and Knowledge Management
  • ,
  • Maxime Sainte-Marie
  • Nadine Desrochers, Canada Research Chair on the Transformations of Scholarly Communication, École de bibliothéconomie et des sciences de l'information, l’Université de Montréal, Canada
  • Rodrigo Costas, Leiden University, University of Stellenbosch
  • ,
  • Vincent Larivière, Canada Research Chair on the Transformations of Scholarly Communication, École de bibliothéconomie et des sciences de l'information, l’Université de Montréal, Univ Quebec Montreal, University of Quebec, University of Quebec Montreal, CIRST, OST, Canada

For the past 50 years, acknowledgments have been studied as important paratextual traces of research practices, collaboration, and infrastructure in science. Since 2008, funding acknowledgments have been indexed by Web of Science, supporting large-scale analyses of research funding. Applying advanced linguistic methods as well as Correspondence Analysis to more than one million acknowledgments from research articles and reviews published in 2015, this paper aims to go beyond funding disclosure and study the main types of contributions found in acknowledgments on a large scale and through disciplinary comparisons. Our analysis shows that technical support is more frequently acknowledged by scholars in Chemistry, Physics and Engineering. Earth and Space, Professional Fields, and Social Sciences are more likely to acknowledge contributions from colleagues, editors, and reviewers, while Biology acknowledgments put more emphasis on logistics and fieldwork-related tasks. Conflicts of interest disclosures (or lack of thereof) are more frequently found in acknowledgments from Clinical Medicine, Health and, to a lesser extent, Psychology. These results demonstrate that acknowledgment practices truly do vary across disciplines and that this can lead to important further research beyond the sole interest in funding.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0185578
JournalPLOS ONE
Volume12
Issue10
ISSN1932-6203
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2017
Externally publishedYes

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