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Mathias Neumann Andersen

Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits

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Standard

Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits. / Chen, Si; Zhenjiang, Zhou; Andersen, Mathias Neumann; Hu, Tian-Tian.

In: Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B - Soil & Plant Science, Vol. 65, No. 5, 2015, p. 460-469.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Chen, S, Zhenjiang, Z, Andersen, MN & Hu, T-T 2015, 'Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits', Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B - Soil & Plant Science, vol. 65, no. 5, pp. 460-469. https://doi.org/10.1080/09064710.2015.1024279

APA

Chen, S., Zhenjiang, Z., Andersen, M. N., & Hu, T-T. (2015). Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits. Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B - Soil & Plant Science, 65(5), 460-469. https://doi.org/10.1080/09064710.2015.1024279

CBE

Chen S, Zhenjiang Z, Andersen MN, Hu T-T. 2015. Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits. Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B - Soil & Plant Science. 65(5):460-469. https://doi.org/10.1080/09064710.2015.1024279

MLA

Chen, Si et al. "Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits". Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B - Soil & Plant Science. 2015, 65(5). 460-469. https://doi.org/10.1080/09064710.2015.1024279

Vancouver

Chen S, Zhenjiang Z, Andersen MN, Hu T-T. Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits. Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B - Soil & Plant Science. 2015;65(5):460-469. https://doi.org/10.1080/09064710.2015.1024279

Author

Chen, Si ; Zhenjiang, Zhou ; Andersen, Mathias Neumann ; Hu, Tian-Tian. / Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits. In: Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B - Soil & Plant Science. 2015 ; Vol. 65, No. 5. pp. 460-469.

Bibtex

@article{8b87b64acd7d467d858659655ff20f5f,
title = "Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits",
abstract = "To investigate the sensitivity of tomato yield and water use efficiency (WUE) to soil water content at different growth stages, the central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was employed in a five-factor-five-level pot experiment under regulated deficit irrigation. Two regression models concerning the effects of stage-specific soil water content on tomato yield and WUE were established. The results showed that the lowest available soil water (ASW) content (around 28{\%}) during vegetative growth stage (here denoted θ1) resulted in high yield and WUE. Moderate (around 69{\%} ASW) during blooming and fruit setting stage (θ2), and the highest ASW (around 92{\%}) during early fruit growth stage (θ3), fruit development (θ4) and fruit maturity (θ5) contributed positively to tomato yield, whereas high WUE was achieved at lower θ2 and θ3 ( around 44{\%} ASW) and higher θ4 and θ5 (around 76{\%} ASW). The strongest coupling effects of ASW in two growth stages were between θ2 and θ5, θ3. In both cases a moderate θ2 was a precondition for maximum yield response to increasing θ5 and θ3. Sensitivity analysis revealed that yield was most sensitive to soil water content at fruit maturity (θ5). Numerical inspection of the regression model showed that the maximum yield, 1166 g per plant, was obtained by the combination of θ1 (c. 28{\%} ASW), θ2 (c. 82{\%} ASW), θ3 (c. 92{\%} ASW), θ4 (c. 92{\%} ASW), and θ5 (c. 92{\%} ASW). This result may guide irrigation scheduling to achieve higher tomato yield and WUE based on specific soil water contents at different growth stages.",
keywords = "tomato, central composite rotatable design, growth stage, yield, WUE",
author = "Si Chen and Zhou Zhenjiang and Andersen, {Mathias Neumann} and Tian-Tian Hu",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1080/09064710.2015.1024279",
language = "English",
volume = "65",
pages = "460--469",
journal = "Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B - Soil & Plant Science",
issn = "0906-4710",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis Scandinavia",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tomato Yield and Water Use Efficiency - Coupling Effects between Growth Stage Specific Soil Water Deficits

AU - Chen, Si

AU - Zhenjiang, Zhou

AU - Andersen, Mathias Neumann

AU - Hu, Tian-Tian

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - To investigate the sensitivity of tomato yield and water use efficiency (WUE) to soil water content at different growth stages, the central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was employed in a five-factor-five-level pot experiment under regulated deficit irrigation. Two regression models concerning the effects of stage-specific soil water content on tomato yield and WUE were established. The results showed that the lowest available soil water (ASW) content (around 28%) during vegetative growth stage (here denoted θ1) resulted in high yield and WUE. Moderate (around 69% ASW) during blooming and fruit setting stage (θ2), and the highest ASW (around 92%) during early fruit growth stage (θ3), fruit development (θ4) and fruit maturity (θ5) contributed positively to tomato yield, whereas high WUE was achieved at lower θ2 and θ3 ( around 44% ASW) and higher θ4 and θ5 (around 76% ASW). The strongest coupling effects of ASW in two growth stages were between θ2 and θ5, θ3. In both cases a moderate θ2 was a precondition for maximum yield response to increasing θ5 and θ3. Sensitivity analysis revealed that yield was most sensitive to soil water content at fruit maturity (θ5). Numerical inspection of the regression model showed that the maximum yield, 1166 g per plant, was obtained by the combination of θ1 (c. 28% ASW), θ2 (c. 82% ASW), θ3 (c. 92% ASW), θ4 (c. 92% ASW), and θ5 (c. 92% ASW). This result may guide irrigation scheduling to achieve higher tomato yield and WUE based on specific soil water contents at different growth stages.

AB - To investigate the sensitivity of tomato yield and water use efficiency (WUE) to soil water content at different growth stages, the central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was employed in a five-factor-five-level pot experiment under regulated deficit irrigation. Two regression models concerning the effects of stage-specific soil water content on tomato yield and WUE were established. The results showed that the lowest available soil water (ASW) content (around 28%) during vegetative growth stage (here denoted θ1) resulted in high yield and WUE. Moderate (around 69% ASW) during blooming and fruit setting stage (θ2), and the highest ASW (around 92%) during early fruit growth stage (θ3), fruit development (θ4) and fruit maturity (θ5) contributed positively to tomato yield, whereas high WUE was achieved at lower θ2 and θ3 ( around 44% ASW) and higher θ4 and θ5 (around 76% ASW). The strongest coupling effects of ASW in two growth stages were between θ2 and θ5, θ3. In both cases a moderate θ2 was a precondition for maximum yield response to increasing θ5 and θ3. Sensitivity analysis revealed that yield was most sensitive to soil water content at fruit maturity (θ5). Numerical inspection of the regression model showed that the maximum yield, 1166 g per plant, was obtained by the combination of θ1 (c. 28% ASW), θ2 (c. 82% ASW), θ3 (c. 92% ASW), θ4 (c. 92% ASW), and θ5 (c. 92% ASW). This result may guide irrigation scheduling to achieve higher tomato yield and WUE based on specific soil water contents at different growth stages.

KW - tomato

KW - central composite rotatable design

KW - growth stage

KW - yield

KW - WUE

U2 - 10.1080/09064710.2015.1024279

DO - 10.1080/09064710.2015.1024279

M3 - Journal article

VL - 65

SP - 460

EP - 469

JO - Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B - Soil & Plant Science

JF - Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section B - Soil & Plant Science

SN - 0906-4710

IS - 5

ER -