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Marc Andersen

Hunter-gatherer children’s object play and tool use: An Ethnohistorical Analysis

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Hunter-gatherer children’s object play and tool use : An Ethnohistorical Analysis. / Lew-Levy, Sheina; Andersen, Marc; Lavi, Noa et al.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 13, 824983, 05.2022.

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Author

Lew-Levy, Sheina ; Andersen, Marc ; Lavi, Noa et al. / Hunter-gatherer children’s object play and tool use : An Ethnohistorical Analysis. In: Frontiers in Psychology. 2022 ; Vol. 13.

Bibtex

@article{5b713faa38044620931cfe3ea81a8302,
title = "Hunter-gatherer children{\textquoteright}s object play and tool use: An Ethnohistorical Analysis",
abstract = "Learning to use, make, and modify tools is key to our species{\textquoteright} success. Researchers have hypothesized that play with objects may have a foundational role in the ontogeny of tool use and, over evolutionary timescales, in cumulative technological innovation. Yet, there are few systematic studies investigating children{\textquoteright}s interactions with objects outside the post-industrialized West. Here, we survey the ethnohistorical record to uncover cross-cultural trends regarding hunter-gatherer children{\textquoteright}s use of objects during play and instrumental activities. Our dataset, consisting of 434 observations of children{\textquoteright}s toys and tools from 54 hunter-gatherer societies, reveals several salient trends: Most objects in our dataset are used in play. Children readily manufacture their own toys, such as dolls and shelters. Most of the objects that children interact with are constructed from multiple materials. Most of the objects in our dataset are full-sized or miniature versions of adult tools, reflecting learning for adult roles. Children also engage with objects related to child culture, primarily during play. Taken together, our findings show that hunter-gatherer children grow up playing, making, and learning with objects.",
author = "Sheina Lew-Levy and Marc Andersen and Noa Lavi and Felix Riede",
year = "2022",
month = may,
doi = "10.3389/fpsyg.2022.824983",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
journal = "Frontiers in Psychology",
issn = "1664-1078",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hunter-gatherer children’s object play and tool use

T2 - An Ethnohistorical Analysis

AU - Lew-Levy, Sheina

AU - Andersen, Marc

AU - Lavi, Noa

AU - Riede, Felix

PY - 2022/5

Y1 - 2022/5

N2 - Learning to use, make, and modify tools is key to our species’ success. Researchers have hypothesized that play with objects may have a foundational role in the ontogeny of tool use and, over evolutionary timescales, in cumulative technological innovation. Yet, there are few systematic studies investigating children’s interactions with objects outside the post-industrialized West. Here, we survey the ethnohistorical record to uncover cross-cultural trends regarding hunter-gatherer children’s use of objects during play and instrumental activities. Our dataset, consisting of 434 observations of children’s toys and tools from 54 hunter-gatherer societies, reveals several salient trends: Most objects in our dataset are used in play. Children readily manufacture their own toys, such as dolls and shelters. Most of the objects that children interact with are constructed from multiple materials. Most of the objects in our dataset are full-sized or miniature versions of adult tools, reflecting learning for adult roles. Children also engage with objects related to child culture, primarily during play. Taken together, our findings show that hunter-gatherer children grow up playing, making, and learning with objects.

AB - Learning to use, make, and modify tools is key to our species’ success. Researchers have hypothesized that play with objects may have a foundational role in the ontogeny of tool use and, over evolutionary timescales, in cumulative technological innovation. Yet, there are few systematic studies investigating children’s interactions with objects outside the post-industrialized West. Here, we survey the ethnohistorical record to uncover cross-cultural trends regarding hunter-gatherer children’s use of objects during play and instrumental activities. Our dataset, consisting of 434 observations of children’s toys and tools from 54 hunter-gatherer societies, reveals several salient trends: Most objects in our dataset are used in play. Children readily manufacture their own toys, such as dolls and shelters. Most of the objects that children interact with are constructed from multiple materials. Most of the objects in our dataset are full-sized or miniature versions of adult tools, reflecting learning for adult roles. Children also engage with objects related to child culture, primarily during play. Taken together, our findings show that hunter-gatherer children grow up playing, making, and learning with objects.

U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2022.824983

DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2022.824983

M3 - Journal article

VL - 13

JO - Frontiers in Psychology

JF - Frontiers in Psychology

SN - 1664-1078

M1 - 824983

ER -