Manuel Mattheisen

The catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) gene and its potential association with schizophrenia: findings from a large German case-control and family-based sample

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Vanessa Nieratschker
  • ,
  • Josef Frank
  • ,
  • Thomas W Mühleisen
  • ,
  • Jana Strohmaier
  • ,
  • Jens R Wendland
  • ,
  • Johannes Schumacher
  • ,
  • Jens Treutlein
  • ,
  • René Breuer
  • ,
  • Rami Abou Jamra
  • ,
  • Manuel Mattheisen
  • Stefan Herms
  • ,
  • Christine Schmäl
  • ,
  • Wolfgang Maier
  • ,
  • Markus M Nöthen
  • ,
  • Sven Cichon
  • ,
  • Marcella Rietschel
  • ,
  • Thomas G Schulze
The aim of the present study was to investigate possible associations between schizophrenia and 13 SNP markers in COMT. No association was observed in 631 cases, 207 nuclear families, and 776 controls. A cognitive performance phenotype (Trail Marking Test) was available for a subgroup of the patients. No association was found between the 13 markers and this phenotype. Four clinically-defined subgroups (early age at onset, negative symptoms, family history of schizophrenia, and life-time major depressive episode) were also investigated. Associations were observed for 3 of these subgroups, although none withstood correction for multiple testing. COMT does not appear to be a risk factor for schizophrenia in this population.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSchizophrenia research
Volume122
Issue1-3
Pages (from-to)24-30
Number of pages7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

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