Lise Torp Jensen

Metabolism-independent sugar sensing in central orexin neurons.

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Metabolism-independent sugar sensing in central orexin neurons. / González, J Antonio; Jensen, Lise T; Fugger, Lars; Burdakov, Denis.

In: Diabetes, Vol. 57, No. 10, 2008, p. 2569-76.

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González, J Antonio ; Jensen, Lise T ; Fugger, Lars ; Burdakov, Denis. / Metabolism-independent sugar sensing in central orexin neurons. In: Diabetes. 2008 ; Vol. 57, No. 10. pp. 2569-76.

Bibtex

@article{455a5ab0a99a11dd889c000ea68e967b,
title = "Metabolism-independent sugar sensing in central orexin neurons.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Glucose sensing by specialized neurons of the hypothalamus is vital for normal energy balance. In many glucose-activated neurons, glucose metabolism is considered a critical step in glucose sensing, but whether glucose-inhibited neurons follow the same strategy is unclear. Orexin/hypocretin neurons of the lateral hypothalamus are widely projecting glucose-inhibited cells essential for normal cognitive arousal and feeding behavior. Here, we used different sugars, energy metabolites, and pharmacological tools to explore the glucose-sensing strategy of orexin cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We carried out patch-clamp recordings of the electrical activity of individual orexin neurons unambiguously identified by transgenic expression of green fluorescent protein in mouse brain slices. RESULTS- We show that 1) 2-deoxyglucose, a nonmetabolizable glucose analog, mimics the effects of glucose; 2) increasing intracellular energy fuel production with lactate does not reproduce glucose responses; 3) orexin cell glucose sensing is unaffected by glucokinase inhibitors alloxan, d-glucosamine, and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine; and 4) orexin glucosensors detect mannose, d-glucose, and 2-deoxyglucose but not galactose, l-glucose, alpha-methyl-d-glucoside, or fructose. CONCLUSIONS: Our new data suggest that behaviorally critical neurocircuits of the lateral hypothalamus contain glucose detectors that exhibit novel sugar selectivity and can operate independently of glucose metabolism.",
author = "Gonz{\'a}lez, {J Antonio} and Jensen, {Lise T} and Lars Fugger and Denis Burdakov",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.2337/db08-0548",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "2569--76",
journal = "Diabetes",
issn = "0012-1797",
publisher = "AMER DIABETES ASSOC",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolism-independent sugar sensing in central orexin neurons.

AU - González, J Antonio

AU - Jensen, Lise T

AU - Fugger, Lars

AU - Burdakov, Denis

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Glucose sensing by specialized neurons of the hypothalamus is vital for normal energy balance. In many glucose-activated neurons, glucose metabolism is considered a critical step in glucose sensing, but whether glucose-inhibited neurons follow the same strategy is unclear. Orexin/hypocretin neurons of the lateral hypothalamus are widely projecting glucose-inhibited cells essential for normal cognitive arousal and feeding behavior. Here, we used different sugars, energy metabolites, and pharmacological tools to explore the glucose-sensing strategy of orexin cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We carried out patch-clamp recordings of the electrical activity of individual orexin neurons unambiguously identified by transgenic expression of green fluorescent protein in mouse brain slices. RESULTS- We show that 1) 2-deoxyglucose, a nonmetabolizable glucose analog, mimics the effects of glucose; 2) increasing intracellular energy fuel production with lactate does not reproduce glucose responses; 3) orexin cell glucose sensing is unaffected by glucokinase inhibitors alloxan, d-glucosamine, and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine; and 4) orexin glucosensors detect mannose, d-glucose, and 2-deoxyglucose but not galactose, l-glucose, alpha-methyl-d-glucoside, or fructose. CONCLUSIONS: Our new data suggest that behaviorally critical neurocircuits of the lateral hypothalamus contain glucose detectors that exhibit novel sugar selectivity and can operate independently of glucose metabolism.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Glucose sensing by specialized neurons of the hypothalamus is vital for normal energy balance. In many glucose-activated neurons, glucose metabolism is considered a critical step in glucose sensing, but whether glucose-inhibited neurons follow the same strategy is unclear. Orexin/hypocretin neurons of the lateral hypothalamus are widely projecting glucose-inhibited cells essential for normal cognitive arousal and feeding behavior. Here, we used different sugars, energy metabolites, and pharmacological tools to explore the glucose-sensing strategy of orexin cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We carried out patch-clamp recordings of the electrical activity of individual orexin neurons unambiguously identified by transgenic expression of green fluorescent protein in mouse brain slices. RESULTS- We show that 1) 2-deoxyglucose, a nonmetabolizable glucose analog, mimics the effects of glucose; 2) increasing intracellular energy fuel production with lactate does not reproduce glucose responses; 3) orexin cell glucose sensing is unaffected by glucokinase inhibitors alloxan, d-glucosamine, and N-acetyl-d-glucosamine; and 4) orexin glucosensors detect mannose, d-glucose, and 2-deoxyglucose but not galactose, l-glucose, alpha-methyl-d-glucoside, or fructose. CONCLUSIONS: Our new data suggest that behaviorally critical neurocircuits of the lateral hypothalamus contain glucose detectors that exhibit novel sugar selectivity and can operate independently of glucose metabolism.

U2 - 10.2337/db08-0548

DO - 10.2337/db08-0548

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 18591392

VL - 57

SP - 2569

EP - 2576

JO - Diabetes

JF - Diabetes

SN - 0012-1797

IS - 10

ER -