Lars Henrik Fugger

Antigen Targeting to Human HLA Class II Molecules Increases Efficacy of DNA Vaccination

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  • Gunnveig Grodeland, K.G. Jebsen Center for Influenza Vaccine Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, 0027 Oslo, Norway; gunnveig.grodeland@medisin.uio.no bjarne.bogen@medisin.uio.no.
  • ,
  • Agnete Brunsvik Fredriksen, Vaccibody AS, 0349 Oslo, Norway.
  • ,
  • Geir Åge Løset, Center for Immune Regulation, Institute of Immunology, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, 0027 Oslo, Norway.
  • ,
  • Elisabeth Vikse, K.G. Jebsen Center for Influenza Vaccine Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, 0027 Oslo, Norway.
  • ,
  • Lars Fugger
  • Bjarne Bogen, K.G. Jebsen Center for Influenza Vaccine Research, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo and Oslo University Hospital, 0027 Oslo, Norway; gunnveig.grodeland@medisin.uio.no bjarne.bogen@medisin.uio.no.

It has been difficult to translate promising results from DNA vaccination in mice to larger animals and humans. Previously, DNA vaccines encoding proteins that target Ag to MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules on APCs have been shown to induce rapid, enhanced, and long-lasting Ag-specific Ab titers in mice. In this study, we describe two novel DNA vaccines that as proteins target HLA class II (HLA-II) molecules. These vaccine proteins cross-react with MHC-II molecules in several species of larger mammals. When tested in ferrets and pigs, a single DNA delivery with low doses of the HLA-II-targeted vaccines resulted in rapid and increased Ab responses. Importantly, painless intradermal jet delivery of DNA was as effective as delivery by needle injection followed by electroporation. As an indication that the vaccines could also be useful for human application, HLA-II-targeted vaccine proteins were found to increase human CD4(+) T cell responses by a factor of ×10(3) in vitro. Thus, targeting of Ag to MHC-II molecules may represent an attractive strategy for increasing efficacy of DNA vaccines in larger animals and humans.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume197
Issue9
Pages (from-to)3575-3585
Number of pages11
ISSN0022-1767
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2016

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