Karin Biering

Pregnancy related pelvic pain is more frequent in women with increased body mass index

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Objective. To investigate the association between pre-pregnancy overweight/obesity and pregnancy-related pelvic pain. Design. Nested case-control study. Setting and population. The Danish National Birth Cohort, a cohort of pregnant women and their children recruited 1996-2002. Methods. The women were interviewed twice during pregnancy and twice after childbirth. The first pregnancy interview provided information on self-reported pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) and possible confounders, while data on pregnancy-related pelvic pain came from an interview six months post partum. Cases (n=2 271) were selected on the basis of self-reported pelvic pain, and controls were randomly selected among women who did not report pelvic pain (n=2 649). We used logistic regression analysis to calculate pregnancy-related pelvic pain odds ratios (OR (95% confidence intervals)) according to pre-pregnant BMI. Main outcome measure. Self-reported pregnancy-related pelvic pain. Results. In the total cohort, 18.5% of all pregnant women reported pregnancy-related pelvic pain. In the nested case-control study, the adjusted ORs for overall pelvic pain were 0.9 (0.7-1.2) in underweight women, 1.2 (1.1-1.4) in overweight women, 1.5 (1.2-2.0) in obese women Class 1 (30≤BMI
Original languageEnglish
JournalActa Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
Volume90
Issue10
Pages (from-to)1132-1139
ISSN0001-6349
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Mar 2011

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