Jakob Kirkegård

Long-term outcome of peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia in patients with previous Heller myotomy

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Long-term outcome of peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia in patients with previous Heller myotomy. / Kristensen, Helle Ø; Kirkegård, Jakob; Kjær, Daniel Willy; Mortensen, Frank Viborg; Kunda, Rastislav; Bjerregaard, Niels Christian.

In: Surgical Endoscopy, Vol. 31, No. 6, 03.10.2016, p. 2596-2601.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{29c61897cf8e465cae2b5352d70f85c6,
title = "Long-term outcome of peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia in patients with previous Heller myotomy",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an emerging procedure in the treatment of esophageal achalasia, a primary motility disorder. However, the long-term outcome of POEM in patients, who have previously undergone a Heller myotomy, is unknown.METHODS: Using a local database, we identified patients with esophageal achalasia, who underwent POEM. We compared patients with a previous Heller myotomy to those, who had received none or only non-surgical therapy prior to the POEM procedure. We conducted follow-up examinations at 3, 12, and 24 months following the procedure.RESULTS: We included 66 consecutive patients undergoing POEM for achalasia, of which 14 (21.2 {\%}) had undergone a prior Heller myotomy. In both groups, the preoperative Eckardt score was 7. Postoperatively, the non-Heller group experienced a more pronounced symptom relief at both 3-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up compared with the Heller group, and there was a tendency for the effect of POEM to reduce over time. We suggest that there is a correlation between preoperative measurements of gastroesophageal sphincter pressures and the chance of a successful POEM.CONCLUSIONS: POEM has a place in the treatment of esophageal achalasia in patients with a prior Heller myotomy and persistent symptoms as it is a safe procedure with acceptable long-term results.",
author = "Kristensen, {Helle {\O}} and Jakob Kirkeg{\aa}rd and Kj{\ae}r, {Daniel Willy} and Mortensen, {Frank Viborg} and Rastislav Kunda and Bjerregaard, {Niels Christian}",
year = "2016",
month = "10",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1007/s00464-016-5267-1",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "2596--2601",
journal = "Surgical Endoscopy",
issn = "0930-2794",
publisher = "Springer New York LLC",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term outcome of peroral endoscopic myotomy for esophageal achalasia in patients with previous Heller myotomy

AU - Kristensen, Helle Ø

AU - Kirkegård, Jakob

AU - Kjær, Daniel Willy

AU - Mortensen, Frank Viborg

AU - Kunda, Rastislav

AU - Bjerregaard, Niels Christian

PY - 2016/10/3

Y1 - 2016/10/3

N2 - BACKGROUND: Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an emerging procedure in the treatment of esophageal achalasia, a primary motility disorder. However, the long-term outcome of POEM in patients, who have previously undergone a Heller myotomy, is unknown.METHODS: Using a local database, we identified patients with esophageal achalasia, who underwent POEM. We compared patients with a previous Heller myotomy to those, who had received none or only non-surgical therapy prior to the POEM procedure. We conducted follow-up examinations at 3, 12, and 24 months following the procedure.RESULTS: We included 66 consecutive patients undergoing POEM for achalasia, of which 14 (21.2 %) had undergone a prior Heller myotomy. In both groups, the preoperative Eckardt score was 7. Postoperatively, the non-Heller group experienced a more pronounced symptom relief at both 3-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up compared with the Heller group, and there was a tendency for the effect of POEM to reduce over time. We suggest that there is a correlation between preoperative measurements of gastroesophageal sphincter pressures and the chance of a successful POEM.CONCLUSIONS: POEM has a place in the treatment of esophageal achalasia in patients with a prior Heller myotomy and persistent symptoms as it is a safe procedure with acceptable long-term results.

AB - BACKGROUND: Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is an emerging procedure in the treatment of esophageal achalasia, a primary motility disorder. However, the long-term outcome of POEM in patients, who have previously undergone a Heller myotomy, is unknown.METHODS: Using a local database, we identified patients with esophageal achalasia, who underwent POEM. We compared patients with a previous Heller myotomy to those, who had received none or only non-surgical therapy prior to the POEM procedure. We conducted follow-up examinations at 3, 12, and 24 months following the procedure.RESULTS: We included 66 consecutive patients undergoing POEM for achalasia, of which 14 (21.2 %) had undergone a prior Heller myotomy. In both groups, the preoperative Eckardt score was 7. Postoperatively, the non-Heller group experienced a more pronounced symptom relief at both 3-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up compared with the Heller group, and there was a tendency for the effect of POEM to reduce over time. We suggest that there is a correlation between preoperative measurements of gastroesophageal sphincter pressures and the chance of a successful POEM.CONCLUSIONS: POEM has a place in the treatment of esophageal achalasia in patients with a prior Heller myotomy and persistent symptoms as it is a safe procedure with acceptable long-term results.

U2 - 10.1007/s00464-016-5267-1

DO - 10.1007/s00464-016-5267-1

M3 - Journal article

VL - 31

SP - 2596

EP - 2601

JO - Surgical Endoscopy

JF - Surgical Endoscopy

SN - 0930-2794

IS - 6

ER -