Department of Business Development and Technology

Gerardo Zarazua de Rubens

Actors, business models, and innovation activity systems for vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology: A comprehensive review

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Actors, business models, and innovation activity systems for vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology : A comprehensive review. / Sovacool, Benjamin K.; Kester, Johannes; Noel, Lance; Zarazua de Rubens, Gerardo.

In: Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Vol. 131, 109963, 10.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperReviewResearchpeer-review

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@article{20a864ab29c346759bf72a735fff4fb2,
title = "Actors, business models, and innovation activity systems for vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology: A comprehensive review",
abstract = "This study is motivated by the prospect of needing to harness significant flows of investment and finance, along with private sector commitment, towards decarbonizing passenger transport in Europe. It asks: what types of actors and stakeholder groups, business models, and resulting innovation activity systems might vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology create or accelerate? Based primarily on qualitative research interviews and focus groups in five countries—Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and a comprehensive literature review, the study assess stakeholder perceptions of primary and secondary business models for V2G. It identifies at least twelve meaningful stakeholder types and corresponding business markets: automotive manufacturers, battery manufacturers, vehicle owners, energy suppliers, transmission and distribution system operators, fleets, aggregators, mobility-as-a-service providers, renewable electricity independent power providers, public transit operators, secondhand markets and secondary markets. These business models fall into the five clusters of equipment, grid services, aggregation, bundling, and secondary markets. We then examine how these business models differ by innovation activity systems—that is, by content, structure, and governance. We lastly translate these findings into policy recommendations of relevance for all types of countries.",
keywords = "Business models, Electric mobility, Electric vehicles, Vehicle-grid-integration, Vehicle-to-grid",
author = "Sovacool, {Benjamin K.} and Johannes Kester and Lance Noel and {Zarazua de Rubens}, Gerardo",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1016/j.rser.2020.109963",
language = "English",
volume = "131",
journal = "Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews",
issn = "1364-0321",
publisher = "Pergamon Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Actors, business models, and innovation activity systems for vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology

T2 - A comprehensive review

AU - Sovacool, Benjamin K.

AU - Kester, Johannes

AU - Noel, Lance

AU - Zarazua de Rubens, Gerardo

PY - 2020/10

Y1 - 2020/10

N2 - This study is motivated by the prospect of needing to harness significant flows of investment and finance, along with private sector commitment, towards decarbonizing passenger transport in Europe. It asks: what types of actors and stakeholder groups, business models, and resulting innovation activity systems might vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology create or accelerate? Based primarily on qualitative research interviews and focus groups in five countries—Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and a comprehensive literature review, the study assess stakeholder perceptions of primary and secondary business models for V2G. It identifies at least twelve meaningful stakeholder types and corresponding business markets: automotive manufacturers, battery manufacturers, vehicle owners, energy suppliers, transmission and distribution system operators, fleets, aggregators, mobility-as-a-service providers, renewable electricity independent power providers, public transit operators, secondhand markets and secondary markets. These business models fall into the five clusters of equipment, grid services, aggregation, bundling, and secondary markets. We then examine how these business models differ by innovation activity systems—that is, by content, structure, and governance. We lastly translate these findings into policy recommendations of relevance for all types of countries.

AB - This study is motivated by the prospect of needing to harness significant flows of investment and finance, along with private sector commitment, towards decarbonizing passenger transport in Europe. It asks: what types of actors and stakeholder groups, business models, and resulting innovation activity systems might vehicle-to-grid (V2G) technology create or accelerate? Based primarily on qualitative research interviews and focus groups in five countries—Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and a comprehensive literature review, the study assess stakeholder perceptions of primary and secondary business models for V2G. It identifies at least twelve meaningful stakeholder types and corresponding business markets: automotive manufacturers, battery manufacturers, vehicle owners, energy suppliers, transmission and distribution system operators, fleets, aggregators, mobility-as-a-service providers, renewable electricity independent power providers, public transit operators, secondhand markets and secondary markets. These business models fall into the five clusters of equipment, grid services, aggregation, bundling, and secondary markets. We then examine how these business models differ by innovation activity systems—that is, by content, structure, and governance. We lastly translate these findings into policy recommendations of relevance for all types of countries.

KW - Business models

KW - Electric mobility

KW - Electric vehicles

KW - Vehicle-grid-integration

KW - Vehicle-to-grid

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85087499010&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.rser.2020.109963

DO - 10.1016/j.rser.2020.109963

M3 - Review

AN - SCOPUS:85087499010

VL - 131

JO - Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews

JF - Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews

SN - 1364-0321

M1 - 109963

ER -