Department of Biology

Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Franziska Eller

Intraspecific differences of Asian/Australian Phragmites australis subgroups reveal no potentially invasive traits

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Liujuan Xie, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao Institute of Marine Geology
  • ,
  • Emil Jespersen
  • Siyuan Ye, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao Institute of Marine Geology
  • ,
  • Lixin Pei, Qingdao National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology, Qingdao Institute of Marine Geology
  • ,
  • Huijia Song, Shandong University
  • ,
  • Xiao Guo, Qingdao Agricultural University, China
  • Weihua Guo, Shandong University, China
  • Hans Brix
  • Franziska Eller

Phragmites australis is a cosmopolitan plant species with high intraspecific diversity and phenotypic plasticity. Due to its variability and large ecological niche breadth, subgroups of P. australis have become invasive in North America, and this invasion has been recognized late. While this cryptic invasion on the American continent has received much attention, little is known about the potential invasiveness of other subgroups, especially within Asian/Australian P. australis. We therefore compared the performance of three subgroups within the Asian/Australian group: a freshwater (CN) and an estuarine (YRD) subgroup collected in China and a genetically closely related subgroup collected from Australia (FEAU), grown in two common gardens in China. Our results showed that the FEAU subgroup had no strong invasive potential, as its total biomass, height, shoot number, specific leaf area, and stomatal conductance were lower than that of the two native subgroups. All three subgroups responded similarly with most traits to the different climates of the gardens, albeit with different response strength, expressed as phenotypic plasticity indices. The potential cryptic invasion risk of the FEAU subgroup in China seems to be low, since its functional traits showed low competitiveness and most traits with the lowest plasticity occurred in FEAU. However, caution is still advised, because other invasive mechanisms, such as enemy release or the performance under extreme environmental conditions were not tested in our study.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHydrobiologia
Volume848
Issue14
Pages (from-to)3331-3351
Number of pages21
ISSN0018-8158
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2021

    Research areas

  • Climate change, Common gardens, Functional traits, Phenotypic plasticity, Plant invasion, Yellow River Delta, COMMON REED, PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY, SALT TOLERANCE, TIDAL WETLANDS, GENETIC-VARIATION, NEW-ENGLAND, CRYPTIC INVASION, LYTHRUM-SALICARIA, NUTRIENT-UPTAKE, AIR HUMIDITY

See relations at Aarhus University Citationformats

ID: 201853406