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Felix Riede

On Research History and Neanderthal Occupation at its Northern Margins

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On Research History and Neanderthal Occupation at its Northern Margins. / Nielsen, Trine Kellberg; Riede, Felix.

In: European Journal of Archaeology, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.11.2018, p. 506-527.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Nielsen, TK & Riede, F 2018, 'On Research History and Neanderthal Occupation at its Northern Margins', European Journal of Archaeology, vol. 21, no. 4, pp. 506-527. https://doi.org/10.1017/eaa.2018.12

APA

CBE

MLA

Nielsen, Trine Kellberg and Felix Riede. "On Research History and Neanderthal Occupation at its Northern Margins". European Journal of Archaeology. 2018, 21(4). 506-527. https://doi.org/10.1017/eaa.2018.12

Vancouver

Author

Nielsen, Trine Kellberg ; Riede, Felix. / On Research History and Neanderthal Occupation at its Northern Margins. In: European Journal of Archaeology. 2018 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 506-527.

Bibtex

@article{ba410186cfe0410a9be87e486a744b80,
title = "On Research History and Neanderthal Occupation at its Northern Margins",
abstract = "Epistemology and research history significantly shape scientific understandings, debates, and publication strategies, albeit often implicitly. In Palaeolithic archaeology in particular, these factors are rarely examined in depth. Here, we present a historiographic analysis of how research history has influenced the debate concerning the possible Neanderthal occupation in Scandinavia. We provide a qualitative discussion of this contentious research field as well as a citation network analysis that visualizes, quantifies, and hence clarifies some of the underlying conceptual, geographic, and temporal patterns in the development of the debate. Our results show significant regionalism as a structuring principle driving this debate as well as a basic rift between professional and avocational archaeologists in how they interpret and publish the available data. We also identify a troubling lack of cross-referencing, even when taking language barriers into account. We argue that the debate about Neanderthal occupation in Scandinavia has been shaped (negatively) by the following phenomena: regionalism, nationalism, lack of research and researchers, non-cumulative work, publication in Nordic languages, science by press release/sensationalism, and a lamentable trend towards arguments ad hominem. In order to take this research field forward, we propose an epistemological turn towards a cumulative, international, and hypothesis-driven agenda based on renewed research efforts and novel citizen science tools.",
author = "Nielsen, {Trine Kellberg} and Felix Riede",
year = "2018",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1017/eaa.2018.12",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "506--527",
journal = "European Journal of Archaeology",
issn = "1461-9571",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - On Research History and Neanderthal Occupation at its Northern Margins

AU - Nielsen, Trine Kellberg

AU - Riede, Felix

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Epistemology and research history significantly shape scientific understandings, debates, and publication strategies, albeit often implicitly. In Palaeolithic archaeology in particular, these factors are rarely examined in depth. Here, we present a historiographic analysis of how research history has influenced the debate concerning the possible Neanderthal occupation in Scandinavia. We provide a qualitative discussion of this contentious research field as well as a citation network analysis that visualizes, quantifies, and hence clarifies some of the underlying conceptual, geographic, and temporal patterns in the development of the debate. Our results show significant regionalism as a structuring principle driving this debate as well as a basic rift between professional and avocational archaeologists in how they interpret and publish the available data. We also identify a troubling lack of cross-referencing, even when taking language barriers into account. We argue that the debate about Neanderthal occupation in Scandinavia has been shaped (negatively) by the following phenomena: regionalism, nationalism, lack of research and researchers, non-cumulative work, publication in Nordic languages, science by press release/sensationalism, and a lamentable trend towards arguments ad hominem. In order to take this research field forward, we propose an epistemological turn towards a cumulative, international, and hypothesis-driven agenda based on renewed research efforts and novel citizen science tools.

AB - Epistemology and research history significantly shape scientific understandings, debates, and publication strategies, albeit often implicitly. In Palaeolithic archaeology in particular, these factors are rarely examined in depth. Here, we present a historiographic analysis of how research history has influenced the debate concerning the possible Neanderthal occupation in Scandinavia. We provide a qualitative discussion of this contentious research field as well as a citation network analysis that visualizes, quantifies, and hence clarifies some of the underlying conceptual, geographic, and temporal patterns in the development of the debate. Our results show significant regionalism as a structuring principle driving this debate as well as a basic rift between professional and avocational archaeologists in how they interpret and publish the available data. We also identify a troubling lack of cross-referencing, even when taking language barriers into account. We argue that the debate about Neanderthal occupation in Scandinavia has been shaped (negatively) by the following phenomena: regionalism, nationalism, lack of research and researchers, non-cumulative work, publication in Nordic languages, science by press release/sensationalism, and a lamentable trend towards arguments ad hominem. In order to take this research field forward, we propose an epistemological turn towards a cumulative, international, and hypothesis-driven agenda based on renewed research efforts and novel citizen science tools.

U2 - 10.1017/eaa.2018.12

DO - 10.1017/eaa.2018.12

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 506

EP - 527

JO - European Journal of Archaeology

JF - European Journal of Archaeology

SN - 1461-9571

IS - 4

ER -