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Christine Parsons

Wrap it in rap! - Music Making with Adolescent CI Users

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@techreport{5be99b9c7f164a4589e7af6781144862,
title = "Wrap it in rap! - Music Making with Adolescent CI Users",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to examine 1) the potential effects of an intensive musical ear training program on the perception of music and speech in prelingually hearing impaired adolescent cochlear implant (CI) users and 2) these adolescents’ music engagement. Eleven adolescent CI users participated in a short intensive training program involving group-based music making activities (e.g. rapping and singing) and self-administered computer based listening exercises. Testing of music and speech discrimination was carried out before and after the program for the CI users and in two sessions equally separated in time for a group of normal-hearing (NH) controls. In addition, the participants reported on their music listening habits and enjoyment. CI users significantly improved their overall music perception and improved their discrimination of melodic contour and rhythm in particular. The NH participants significantly outperformed the CI users in all music and speech discrimination tests except melodic contour. Despite their poor music discrimination abilities, the CI users reported levels of music engagement and enjoyment that were comparable to the NH group. The CI participants showed high levels of engagement with the music making group, as demonstrated by lack of attrition, and exhibited a marked improvement in their performative skills. By contrast, the participants found the computer based training only moderately useful and on average spent much less time on training than requested. The findings are an indication of the potential usefulness of targeted music training as an effective and motivating activity for young CI users. In particular, rapping and creation of rap lyrics may form an appealing and relevant element in future training programs; the CI facilitates it well, it has a strong and repetitive focus on language, articulation, rhythm and rhyme and might even represent a possible form of artistic expression for some of the young CI users.",
author = "Bj{\o}rn Petersen and S{\o}rensen, {Stine Derdau} and Pedersen, {Ellen Raben} and Christine Parsons and Peter Vuust",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "1",
language = "English",
type = "WorkingPaper",

}

RIS

TY - UNPB

T1 - Wrap it in rap! - Music Making with Adolescent CI Users

AU - Petersen, Bjørn

AU - Sørensen, Stine Derdau

AU - Pedersen, Ellen Raben

AU - Parsons, Christine

AU - Vuust, Peter

PY - 2015/11/1

Y1 - 2015/11/1

N2 - The purpose of this study was to examine 1) the potential effects of an intensive musical ear training program on the perception of music and speech in prelingually hearing impaired adolescent cochlear implant (CI) users and 2) these adolescents’ music engagement. Eleven adolescent CI users participated in a short intensive training program involving group-based music making activities (e.g. rapping and singing) and self-administered computer based listening exercises. Testing of music and speech discrimination was carried out before and after the program for the CI users and in two sessions equally separated in time for a group of normal-hearing (NH) controls. In addition, the participants reported on their music listening habits and enjoyment. CI users significantly improved their overall music perception and improved their discrimination of melodic contour and rhythm in particular. The NH participants significantly outperformed the CI users in all music and speech discrimination tests except melodic contour. Despite their poor music discrimination abilities, the CI users reported levels of music engagement and enjoyment that were comparable to the NH group. The CI participants showed high levels of engagement with the music making group, as demonstrated by lack of attrition, and exhibited a marked improvement in their performative skills. By contrast, the participants found the computer based training only moderately useful and on average spent much less time on training than requested. The findings are an indication of the potential usefulness of targeted music training as an effective and motivating activity for young CI users. In particular, rapping and creation of rap lyrics may form an appealing and relevant element in future training programs; the CI facilitates it well, it has a strong and repetitive focus on language, articulation, rhythm and rhyme and might even represent a possible form of artistic expression for some of the young CI users.

AB - The purpose of this study was to examine 1) the potential effects of an intensive musical ear training program on the perception of music and speech in prelingually hearing impaired adolescent cochlear implant (CI) users and 2) these adolescents’ music engagement. Eleven adolescent CI users participated in a short intensive training program involving group-based music making activities (e.g. rapping and singing) and self-administered computer based listening exercises. Testing of music and speech discrimination was carried out before and after the program for the CI users and in two sessions equally separated in time for a group of normal-hearing (NH) controls. In addition, the participants reported on their music listening habits and enjoyment. CI users significantly improved their overall music perception and improved their discrimination of melodic contour and rhythm in particular. The NH participants significantly outperformed the CI users in all music and speech discrimination tests except melodic contour. Despite their poor music discrimination abilities, the CI users reported levels of music engagement and enjoyment that were comparable to the NH group. The CI participants showed high levels of engagement with the music making group, as demonstrated by lack of attrition, and exhibited a marked improvement in their performative skills. By contrast, the participants found the computer based training only moderately useful and on average spent much less time on training than requested. The findings are an indication of the potential usefulness of targeted music training as an effective and motivating activity for young CI users. In particular, rapping and creation of rap lyrics may form an appealing and relevant element in future training programs; the CI facilitates it well, it has a strong and repetitive focus on language, articulation, rhythm and rhyme and might even represent a possible form of artistic expression for some of the young CI users.

M3 - Working paper

BT - Wrap it in rap! - Music Making with Adolescent CI Users

ER -