Christina C. Dahm

Red blood cell fatty acids and risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Jakob Linseisen, UNIKA-T, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany
  • Nina Grundmann, UNIKA-T, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany
  • Dorothee Zoller, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ)., Germany
  • Tilman Kuehn, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ)., Germany
  • Eugene H J M Jansen, Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands., Netherlands
  • Veronique Chajes, WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer, France
  • Veronika Fedirko, Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA., United States
  • Elisabete Weiderpass, WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer, France
  • Christina C Dahm
  • Kim Overvad
  • Anne Tjonneland, Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Denmark
  • Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Exposome and Heredity Team, Universite Paris-Sud, UVSQ, CESP, INSERM, France
  • Joseph A Rothwell, Exposome and Heredity Team, Universite Paris-Sud, UVSQ, CESP, INSERM, France
  • Gianluca Severi, Exposome and Heredity Team, Universite Paris-Sud, UVSQ, CESP, INSERM, France
  • Rudolf Kaaks, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ)., Germany
  • Matthias B Schulze, Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany, Germany
  • Krasimira Aleksandrova, Department of Molecular Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany, Germany
  • Sabina Sieri, Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Milan, Italy., Italy
  • Salvatore Panico, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Unit of Clinical Epidemiology and Predictive Medicine, Federico II University, Italy
  • Rosario Tumino, Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale 7, Ragusa, Italy., Italy
  • Giovanna Masala, Cancer Risk Factors and Lifestyle Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network, ISPRO., Italy
  • Laura De Marco, Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, Città della Salute e della Scienza University-Hospital and Center for Cancer Prevention (CPO), Turin, Italy., Italy
  • Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands., Netherlands
  • Roel Vermeulen, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Netherlands
  • Inger T Gram, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway., Norway
  • Guri Skeie, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway., Norway
  • Maria-Dolores Chirlaque, Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad Catolica San Antonio de Murcia., Spain
  • Eva Ardanaz, Navarra Public Health Institute, Spain
  • Antonio Agudo, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain
  • Maria-Jose Sánchez, Granada Cancer Registry, Andalusian School of Public Health; Biomedical Research Institute of Granada (ibs.Granada), University of Granada; CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP)., Spain
  • Pilar Amiano, Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Penn Highlands Healthcare, Spain
  • Maria Wennberg, Section of Sustainable Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
  • Stina Bodén, Section of Sustainable Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
  • Aurora Perez-Cornago, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, England., United Kingdom
  • Elom Kouassivi Aglago, WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer, France
  • Marc J Gunter, WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer
  • ,
  • Mazda Jenab, WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer, France
  • Alicia K Heath, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, England., United Kingdom
  • Alexandra Nieters, Center for Chronic Immunodeficiency (CCI), Medical Center - University of Freiburg, Faculty of Medicine, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany., Germany

BACKGROUND: A growing body of evidence suggests that alterations of dietary fatty acid (FA) profiles are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, data from large-scale epidemiological studies using circulating FA measurements to objectively assess individual FA and FA categories are scarce.

METHODS: To investigate the association between red blood cell (RBC) membrane FAs and risk of CRC in a case-control study nested within a large prospective cohort. After a median follow-up of 6.4 years, 1069 incident CRC cases were identified and matched to 1069 controls among participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). The FA composition of RBC phospholipids (in mol%) was analyzed by gas chromatography, and their association with risk of CRC was estimated by multivariable adjusted conditional logistic regression models.

RESULTS: After correction for multiple testing, subjects with higher concentrations of RBC stearic acid were at higher risk for CRC (OR=1.23; 95% CI=1.07-1.42, per 1 mol%). Conversely, CRC incidence decreased with increasing proportions of RBC n-3 PUFA, particularly eicosapentaenoic acid (0.75; 0.62-0.92, per 1 mol%). The findings for the n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid were inconsistent.

CONCLUSIONS: The positive association between pre-diagnostic RBC stearic acid and CRC reflects putative differences in FA intake and metabolism between cancer cases and matched controls which deserve further investigation. The inverse relationship between EPA and CRC is in line with the repeatedly reported protective effect of fish consumption on CRC risk.

IMPACT: These findings add to the evidence on CRC prevention.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbercebp.1426.2020
JournalCancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology
ISSN1055-9965
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Feb 2021

    Research areas

  • colorectal cancer, fatty acids, erythrocytes, biomarker, EPIC

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