Christina C. Dahm

Plasma concentrations of advanced glycation end-products and colorectal cancer risk in the EPIC study

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  • Elom K Aglago, Biomarker Group, Nutrition and Metabolism Section, IARC, Lyon, France
  • Casper G Schalkwijk, Maastricht University Medical Center, Netherlands
  • Heinz Freisling, Biomarker Group, Nutrition and Metabolism Section, IARC, Lyon, France
  • Veronika Fedirko, Emory University, United States
  • David J Hughes, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  • Li Jiao, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, United States
  • Christina C Dahm
  • Anja Olsen
  • Anne Tjønneland, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark., Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark, Denmark
  • Verena Katzke, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Germany
  • Theron Johnson, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Germany
  • Matthias B Schulze, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Potsdam, Germany., Institute of Nutrition Science, University of Potsdam, Nuthetal, Germany., Germany
  • Krasimira Aleksandrova, Institute of Nutrition Science, University of Potsdam, Nuthetal, Germany., Nutrition, Immunity and Metabolism Senior Scientist Group, Department of Nutrition and Gerontology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany., Germany
  • Giovanna Masala, Institute for Cancer Research, Italy
  • Sabina Sieri, Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Milan, Italy., Italy
  • Vittorio Simeon, University Luigi Vanvitelli, Italy
  • Rosario Tumino, Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, 'Civic - M.P.Arezzo' Hospital, Italy., Italy
  • Alessandra Macciotta, University of Turin, Italy
  • Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, Netherlands
  • Guri Skeie, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway
  • Inger Torhild Gram, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway
  • Torkjel Sandanger, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway
  • Paula Jakszyn, Medical Oncology, Catalan Institute of Oncology, IDIBELL., Ramon Llull University, Spain
  • Maria-Jose Sánchez, Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública (EASP), Granada, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria (ibs.GRANADA), University of Granada, Consorcio Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain., Spain
  • Pilar Amiano, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain., BioDonostia Research Institute, Spain
  • Sandra M Colorado-Yohar, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain., Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain., Research Group on Demography and Health, National Faculty of Public Health, University of Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia., Spain
  • Aurelio Barricarte Gurrea, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain., Navarra Public Health Institute, Navarra Institute for Health Research (IdiSNA), Spain
  • Aurora Perez-Cornago, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom
  • Ana-Lucia Mayén, Biomarker Group, Nutrition and Metabolism Section, IARC, Lyon
  • ,
  • Elisabete Weiderpass, Office of the Director, International Agency For Research On Cancer., France
  • Marc J Gunter, WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer
  • ,
  • Alicia K Heath, Imperial College, United Kingdom
  • Mazda Jenab, Biomarker Group, Nutrition and Metabolism Section, IARC, Lyon, France

Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are a heterogeneous group of compounds formed by the non-enzymatic reaction between amino-acids and reducing sugars, or dicarbonyls as intermediate compounds. Experimental studies suggest that AGEs may promote colorectal cancer, but prospective epidemiologic studies are inconclusive. We conducted a case-control study nested within a large European cohort. Plasma concentrations of three protein-bound AGEs: N ε-(carboxy-methyl)lysine (CML), N ε-(carboxy-ethyl)lysine (CEL) and N δ-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)-ornithine (MG-H1) were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry in baseline samples collected from 1,378 incident primary colorectal cancer cases and 1,378 matched controls. Multivariable-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed using conditional logistic regression for colorectal cancer risk associated with CML, CEL, MG-H1, total AGEs, and [CEL+MG-H1: CML] and [CEL:MG-H1] ratios. Inverse colorectal cancer risk associations were observed for CML (OR comparing highest to lowest quintile, ORQ5vs.Q1=0.40, 95%CI:0.27-0.59), MG-H1 (ORQ5vs.Q1=0.73, 95%CI:0.53 - 1.00) and total AGEs (OR Q5vs.Q1=0.52, 95%CI:0.37 - 0.73) whereas no association was observed for CEL. A higher [CEL+MG-H1: CML] ratio was associated with colorectal cancer risk (ORQ5vs.Q1=1.91, 95%CI:1.31-2.79). The associations observed did not differ by sex, or by tumour anatomical subsite. Although individual AGEs concentrations appear to be inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, a higher ratio of methylglyoxal-derived AGEs versus those derived from glyoxal (calculated by [CEL+MG-H1: CML] ratio) showed a strong positive risk association. Further insight on the metabolism of AGEs and their dicarbonyls precursors, and their roles in colorectal cancer development is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberbgab026
JournalCarcinogenesis
ISSN0143-3334
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 29 Mar 2021

Bibliographical note

© The Author(s) 2021. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

    Research areas

  • advanced glycation end-product, colorectal cancer, glycotoxin

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