Christina C. Dahm

Measured adiposity in relation to head and neck cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  • Heather A Ward, School of Public Health, Imperial College heather.ward@imperial.ac.uk., United Kingdom
  • Petra A Wark, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK., United Kingdom
  • David C Muller, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK., United Kingdom
  • Annika Steffen, Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke., Germany
  • Mattias Johansson, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO)., Department of Biobank Research, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden., France
  • Teresa Norat, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK., United Kingdom
  • Marc J Gunter, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK., International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France., United Kingdom
  • Kim Overvad
  • Christina C Dahm
  • Jytte Halkjær, Forskningsenheden Kost, gener og miljø, Kræftens Bekæmpelse, Denmark
  • Anne Tjønneland, Forskningsenheden Kost, gener og miljø, Kræftens Bekæmpelse, Denmark
  • Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Université Paris-Saclay, Univ. Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Inserm, CESP, Generations and health., Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France., France
  • Guy Fagherazzi, Université Paris-Saclay, Univ. Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Inserm, CESP, Generations and health., Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France., France
  • Sylvie Mesrine, Université Paris-Saclay, Univ. Paris-Sud, UVSQ, Inserm, CESP, Generations and health., Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France., France
  • Paul Brennan, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO)., France
  • Heinz Freisling, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO)., France
  • Kuanrong Li, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO)., France
  • Rudolf Kaaks, Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Centre k.tikk@dkfz.de., Germany
  • Antonia Trichopoulou, Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens., Greece
  • Pagona Lagiou, Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens., Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, Greece
  • Salvatore Panico, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Section of Endocrinology, Federico II University., Italy
  • Sara Grioni, Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS National Cancer Institute., Italy
  • Rosario Tumino, Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic-M.P.Arezzo" Hospital, ASP, Via Dante N° 109, 97100 Ragusa, Italy., Italy
  • Paolo Vineis, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK., Human Genetics Foundation - HuGeF, Turin, Italy., United Kingdom
  • Domenico Palli, Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy., Italy
  • Petra H M Peeters, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK., Julius Centre for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands., United Kingdom
  • Bas H Bueno-De-Mesquita, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK., National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, United Kingdom
  • Elisabete Weiderpass, Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, The Arctic University of Norway., Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, N-0304 Oslo, Norway., Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland., Norway
  • Antonio Agudo, Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), 08908 Barcelona, Spain., Spain
  • José Ramón Quirós, Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain., Spain
  • Nerea Larranaga, Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa-BIODONOSTIA, Basque Regional Health Department, Donostia, CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain
  • Eva Ardanaz, Navarra Public Health Institute, c/Leyre 15, Pamplona 31003, Pamplona, Spain., Spain
  • Jose Maria Huerta, Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council., Spain
  • Maria-Jose Sánchez, Andalucian School of Public Health, Research Institute Biosanitary Granada.
  • ,
  • Goran Laurell, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, University Hospital., Sweden
  • Ingegerd Johansson, Umeå University, Sweden
  • Ulla Westin, Ear Nose and Throat Department, Lund University., Sweden
  • Peter Wallstrom, Nutrition Epidemiology Research Group, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital., Sweden
  • Kathryn E Bradbury, Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK., United Kingdom
  • Nicholas J Wareham, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Kay-Tee Khaw, Clinical Gerontology Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Hills Rd, Cambridge CB2 0SP, UK., United Kingdom
  • Clare Pearson, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK., United Kingdom
  • Heiner Boeing, Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke., Germany
  • Elio Riboli, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK., United Kingdom

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence from cohort studies indicates that adiposity is associated with greater incidence of head and neck cancer (HNC). However, most studies have used self-reported anthropometry which is prone to error.

METHODS: Among 363 094 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study (EPIC) with measured anthropometry, there were 837 incident cases of HNC. HNC risk was examined in relation to body mass index (BMI) [lean: < 22.5 kg/m2, normal weight (reference): 22.5-24.9 kg/m2, overweight 25-29.9 kg/m2, obese: > 30 kg/m2], waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC) and waist to hip ratio (WHR) using Cox proportional hazards models.

RESULTS: Among men, a BMI < 22.5 kg/m2 was associated with higher HNC risk [hazard ratio (HR) 1.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.23 - 2.12)]; BMI was not associated with HNC among women. WC and WHR were associated with greater risk of HNC among women, (WC per 5 cm: HR 1.08, 95% CI 1.02 - 1.15; WHR per 0.1 unit: HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.38 - 1.93). After stratification by smoking status, the association for WHR was present only among smokers (p interaction 0.004). Among men, WC and WHR were associated with HNC only upon additional adjustment for BMI (WC per 5 cm: HR 1.16, 95% CI 1.07 - 1.26; WHR per 0.1 unit: HR 1.42, 95% CI 1.21 - 1.65).

CONCLUSION: Central adiposity, particularly among women, may have a stronger association with HNC risk than previously estimated.

IMPACT: Strategies to reduce obesity may beneficially impact HNC incidence.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention
Volume26
Issue6
Pages (from-to)895-204
Number of pages10
ISSN1055-9965
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2017

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