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Christian B.N. Gade

"Restorative Justice": History of the Term's International and Danish Use

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Standard

"Restorative Justice": History of the Term's International and Danish Use. / Gade, Christian B. N.

Nordic Mediation Research. ed. / Anna Nylund; Kaijus Ervasti; Lin Adrian. Springer, 2018. p. 27-40.

Research output: Contribution to book/anthology/report/proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

Gade, C. B. N. (2018). "Restorative Justice": History of the Term's International and Danish Use. In A. Nylund, K. Ervasti, & L. Adrian (Eds.), Nordic Mediation Research (pp. 27-40). Springer. https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2F978-3-319-73019-6_3.pdf

CBE

Gade CBN. 2018. "Restorative Justice": History of the Term's International and Danish Use. Nylund A, Ervasti K, Adrian L, editors. In Nordic Mediation Research. Springer. pp. 27-40.

MLA

Gade, Christian B. N. ""Restorative Justice": History of the Term's International and Danish Use"., Nylund, Anna Ervasti, Kaijus Adrian, Lin (editors). Nordic Mediation Research. Springer. 2018, 27-40.

Vancouver

Gade CBN. "Restorative Justice": History of the Term's International and Danish Use. In Nylund A, Ervasti K, Adrian L, editors, Nordic Mediation Research. Springer. 2018. p. 27-40

Author

Gade, Christian B. N. / "Restorative Justice": History of the Term's International and Danish Use. Nordic Mediation Research. editor / Anna Nylund ; Kaijus Ervasti ; Lin Adrian. Springer, 2018. pp. 27-40

Bibtex

@inbook{1b0ee4a74ae24db5886267cd1468ce36,
title = "{"}Restorative Justice{"}: History of the Term's International and Danish Use",
abstract = "In this article, I explore the historical origin and development of the use of the term “restorative justice” in published sources. The main argument is that the growing popularity of the term and its expanding use makes increasingly blurred what restorative justice is. I begin by investigating the term{\textquoteright}s international usage, tracing it back to written sources from the nineteenth century. Then, I cite personal communication with Howard Zehr to describe how his use of the term was inspired by Albert Eglash. Zehr initially popularised the term and, in the 1990s, use of the term expanded. In the 2000s, the term began to appear in United Nations and European Union documents, illustrating that restorative justice had become an internationally recognised approach to justice. After describing this international development, I analyse the Danish context, where the term “restorative justice” began to appear in writings around the year 2000. Around the same time, the existing Danish victim offender mediation programme became connected to restorative justice. Later, Danish practices outside the area of criminal justice became associated with the term. In conclusion, I argue that a potential problem of the expanded use of the term “restorative justice”—both in Denmark and internationally—is that usage may become so broad that the concept loses its meaning.",
author = "Gade, {Christian B. N.}",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-3-319-73018-9",
pages = "27--40",
editor = "Nylund, {Anna } and Kaijus Ervasti and Adrian, {Lin }",
booktitle = "Nordic Mediation Research",
publisher = "Springer",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - "Restorative Justice": History of the Term's International and Danish Use

AU - Gade, Christian B. N.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - In this article, I explore the historical origin and development of the use of the term “restorative justice” in published sources. The main argument is that the growing popularity of the term and its expanding use makes increasingly blurred what restorative justice is. I begin by investigating the term’s international usage, tracing it back to written sources from the nineteenth century. Then, I cite personal communication with Howard Zehr to describe how his use of the term was inspired by Albert Eglash. Zehr initially popularised the term and, in the 1990s, use of the term expanded. In the 2000s, the term began to appear in United Nations and European Union documents, illustrating that restorative justice had become an internationally recognised approach to justice. After describing this international development, I analyse the Danish context, where the term “restorative justice” began to appear in writings around the year 2000. Around the same time, the existing Danish victim offender mediation programme became connected to restorative justice. Later, Danish practices outside the area of criminal justice became associated with the term. In conclusion, I argue that a potential problem of the expanded use of the term “restorative justice”—both in Denmark and internationally—is that usage may become so broad that the concept loses its meaning.

AB - In this article, I explore the historical origin and development of the use of the term “restorative justice” in published sources. The main argument is that the growing popularity of the term and its expanding use makes increasingly blurred what restorative justice is. I begin by investigating the term’s international usage, tracing it back to written sources from the nineteenth century. Then, I cite personal communication with Howard Zehr to describe how his use of the term was inspired by Albert Eglash. Zehr initially popularised the term and, in the 1990s, use of the term expanded. In the 2000s, the term began to appear in United Nations and European Union documents, illustrating that restorative justice had become an internationally recognised approach to justice. After describing this international development, I analyse the Danish context, where the term “restorative justice” began to appear in writings around the year 2000. Around the same time, the existing Danish victim offender mediation programme became connected to restorative justice. Later, Danish practices outside the area of criminal justice became associated with the term. In conclusion, I argue that a potential problem of the expanded use of the term “restorative justice”—both in Denmark and internationally—is that usage may become so broad that the concept loses its meaning.

M3 - Book chapter

SN - 978-3-319-73018-9

SP - 27

EP - 40

BT - Nordic Mediation Research

A2 - Nylund, Anna

A2 - Ervasti, Kaijus

A2 - Adrian, Lin

PB - Springer

ER -

994 / i29