Bo Martin Bibby

Cohort study of adherence to correct hand antisepsis before and after performance of clinical procedures

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Cohort study of adherence to correct hand antisepsis before and after performance of clinical procedures. / Laustsen, Sussie; Lund, Elisabeth; Bibby, Bo Martin; Kristensen, Brian; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Kjølseth Møller, Jens.

In: Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, Vol. 30, No. 2, 2009, p. 172-8.

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@article{56ac41603a1411de8dc9000ea68e967b,
title = "Cohort study of adherence to correct hand antisepsis before and after performance of clinical procedures",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate the rate of adherence by hospital staff members to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before and after performance of clinical procedures. DESIGN: A cohort study conducted during the period from 2006 through 2007 and 2 cross-sectional studies conducted in 2006 and 2007. SETTING: Arhus University Hospital, Skejby, in Arhus, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Various hospital staff members. METHODS: Following an ongoing campaign promoting the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub, we observed rates of adherence by hospital staff to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub. Observations were made before and after each contact with patients or patient surroundings during 5 weekdays during the period from 2006 through 2007 in 10 different hospital units. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the rate of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before and after performance of a clinical procedure. RESULTS: A total of 496 participants were observed during 22,906 opportunities for hand hygiene (ie, 11,177 before and 11,729 after clinical procedures) that required the use of alcohol-based hand rub. The overall rates of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub were 62.3{\%} (6,968 of the 11,177 opportunities) before performance and 68.6{\%} (8,041 of the 11,729 opportunities) after performance of clinical procedures. Compared with male participants, female participants were significantly better at adhering to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before performance (odds ratio [OR] 1.51 [95{\%} confidence interval {CI}, 1.09-2.10]) and after performance (OR, 1.73 [95{\%} CI, 1.27-2.36]) of clinical procedures. In general, the rate of adherence was significantly higher after the performance of clinical procedures, compared with before (OR, 1.43 [95{\%} CI, 1.35-1.52]). For our cohort of 214 participants who were observed during 14,319 opportunities, the rates of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub were 63.2{\%} (4,469 of the 7,071 opportunities) before performance and 69.3{\%} (5,021 of the 7,248 opportunities) after performance of clinical procedures, and these rates increased significantly from 2006 to 2007, except for physicians. CONCLUSION: We found a high and increasing rate of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before and after performance of clinical procedures following a campaign that promoted the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub. More hospital staff performed hand hygiene with alcohol-based hand rub after performance of clinical procedures, compared with before performance. Future campaigns to improve the rate of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub ought be aware that certain groups of hospital staff (eg, male staff members) are known to exhibit a low level of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub.",
keywords = "Antisepsis, Cohort Studies, Cross Infection, Ethanol, Female, Guideline Adherence, Handwashing, Hospitals, University, Humans, Infection Control, Male, Personnel, Hospital",
author = "Sussie Laustsen and Elisabeth Lund and Bibby, {Bo Martin} and Brian Kristensen and Thulstrup, {Ane Marie} and {Kj{\o}lseth M{\o}ller}, Jens",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1086/593206",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "172--8",
journal = "Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology",
issn = "0899-823X",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cohort study of adherence to correct hand antisepsis before and after performance of clinical procedures

AU - Laustsen, Sussie

AU - Lund, Elisabeth

AU - Bibby, Bo Martin

AU - Kristensen, Brian

AU - Thulstrup, Ane Marie

AU - Kjølseth Møller, Jens

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the rate of adherence by hospital staff members to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before and after performance of clinical procedures. DESIGN: A cohort study conducted during the period from 2006 through 2007 and 2 cross-sectional studies conducted in 2006 and 2007. SETTING: Arhus University Hospital, Skejby, in Arhus, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Various hospital staff members. METHODS: Following an ongoing campaign promoting the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub, we observed rates of adherence by hospital staff to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub. Observations were made before and after each contact with patients or patient surroundings during 5 weekdays during the period from 2006 through 2007 in 10 different hospital units. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the rate of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before and after performance of a clinical procedure. RESULTS: A total of 496 participants were observed during 22,906 opportunities for hand hygiene (ie, 11,177 before and 11,729 after clinical procedures) that required the use of alcohol-based hand rub. The overall rates of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub were 62.3% (6,968 of the 11,177 opportunities) before performance and 68.6% (8,041 of the 11,729 opportunities) after performance of clinical procedures. Compared with male participants, female participants were significantly better at adhering to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before performance (odds ratio [OR] 1.51 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.09-2.10]) and after performance (OR, 1.73 [95% CI, 1.27-2.36]) of clinical procedures. In general, the rate of adherence was significantly higher after the performance of clinical procedures, compared with before (OR, 1.43 [95% CI, 1.35-1.52]). For our cohort of 214 participants who were observed during 14,319 opportunities, the rates of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub were 63.2% (4,469 of the 7,071 opportunities) before performance and 69.3% (5,021 of the 7,248 opportunities) after performance of clinical procedures, and these rates increased significantly from 2006 to 2007, except for physicians. CONCLUSION: We found a high and increasing rate of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before and after performance of clinical procedures following a campaign that promoted the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub. More hospital staff performed hand hygiene with alcohol-based hand rub after performance of clinical procedures, compared with before performance. Future campaigns to improve the rate of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub ought be aware that certain groups of hospital staff (eg, male staff members) are known to exhibit a low level of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the rate of adherence by hospital staff members to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before and after performance of clinical procedures. DESIGN: A cohort study conducted during the period from 2006 through 2007 and 2 cross-sectional studies conducted in 2006 and 2007. SETTING: Arhus University Hospital, Skejby, in Arhus, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Various hospital staff members. METHODS: Following an ongoing campaign promoting the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub, we observed rates of adherence by hospital staff to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub. Observations were made before and after each contact with patients or patient surroundings during 5 weekdays during the period from 2006 through 2007 in 10 different hospital units. A logistic regression model was used to estimate the rate of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before and after performance of a clinical procedure. RESULTS: A total of 496 participants were observed during 22,906 opportunities for hand hygiene (ie, 11,177 before and 11,729 after clinical procedures) that required the use of alcohol-based hand rub. The overall rates of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub were 62.3% (6,968 of the 11,177 opportunities) before performance and 68.6% (8,041 of the 11,729 opportunities) after performance of clinical procedures. Compared with male participants, female participants were significantly better at adhering to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before performance (odds ratio [OR] 1.51 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.09-2.10]) and after performance (OR, 1.73 [95% CI, 1.27-2.36]) of clinical procedures. In general, the rate of adherence was significantly higher after the performance of clinical procedures, compared with before (OR, 1.43 [95% CI, 1.35-1.52]). For our cohort of 214 participants who were observed during 14,319 opportunities, the rates of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub were 63.2% (4,469 of the 7,071 opportunities) before performance and 69.3% (5,021 of the 7,248 opportunities) after performance of clinical procedures, and these rates increased significantly from 2006 to 2007, except for physicians. CONCLUSION: We found a high and increasing rate of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub before and after performance of clinical procedures following a campaign that promoted the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub. More hospital staff performed hand hygiene with alcohol-based hand rub after performance of clinical procedures, compared with before performance. Future campaigns to improve the rate of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub ought be aware that certain groups of hospital staff (eg, male staff members) are known to exhibit a low level of adherence to the correct use of alcohol-based hand rub.

KW - Antisepsis

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Cross Infection

KW - Ethanol

KW - Female

KW - Guideline Adherence

KW - Handwashing

KW - Hospitals, University

KW - Humans

KW - Infection Control

KW - Male

KW - Personnel, Hospital

U2 - 10.1086/593206

DO - 10.1086/593206

M3 - Journal article

VL - 30

SP - 172

EP - 178

JO - Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology

JF - Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology

SN - 0899-823X

IS - 2

ER -