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Bjørn Petersen

Imagine, Sing, Play- Combined Mental, Vocal and Physical Practice Improves Musical Performance

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Imagine, Sing, Play- Combined Mental, Vocal and Physical Practice Improves Musical Performance. / Steenstrup, Kristian; Haumann, Niels Trusbak; Kleber, Boris; Camarasa, Carles; Vuust, Peter; Petersen, Bjørn.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 12, 757052, 10.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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@article{2ec924bf6b5941afa04a609b828d4ccf,
title = "Imagine, Sing, Play- Combined Mental, Vocal and Physical Practice Improves Musical Performance",
abstract = "Classical musicians face a high demand for flawless and expressive performance, leading to highly intensified practice activity. Whereas the advantage of using mental strategies is well documented in sports research, few studies have explored the efficacy of mental imagery and overt singing on musical instrumental learning. In this study, 50 classically trained trumpet students performed short unfamiliar pieces. Performances were recorded before and after applying four prescribed practice strategies which were (1) physical practice, (2) mental imagery, (3) overt singing with optional use of solfege, (4) a combination of 1, 2 and 3 or a control condition, no practice. Three experts independently assessed pitch and rhythm accuracy, sound quality, intonation, and musical expression in all recordings. We found higher gains in the overall performance, as well as in pitch accuracy for the physical practice, and the combined practice strategies, compared to no practice. Furthermore, only the combined strategy yielded a significant improvement in musical expression. Pitch performance improvement was positively correlated with previous solfege training and frequent use of random practice strategies. The findings highlight benefits from applying practice strategies that complement physical practice in music instrument practice in short term early stages of learning a new piece. The study may generalize to other forms of learning, involving cognitive processes and motor skills.",
keywords = "auditory imagery, brass pedagogy, deliberate practice, interleaved/random practice, motor imagery, solfege, trumpet, varied practice",
author = "Kristian Steenstrup and Haumann, {Niels Trusbak} and Boris Kleber and Carles Camarasa and Peter Vuust and Bj{\o}rn Petersen",
note = "Publisher Copyright: Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 Steenstrup, Haumann, Kleber, Camarasa, Vuust and Petersen.",
year = "2021",
month = oct,
doi = "10.3389/fpsyg.2021.757052",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "Frontiers in Psychology",
issn = "1664-1078",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Imagine, Sing, Play- Combined Mental, Vocal and Physical Practice Improves Musical Performance

AU - Steenstrup, Kristian

AU - Haumann, Niels Trusbak

AU - Kleber, Boris

AU - Camarasa, Carles

AU - Vuust, Peter

AU - Petersen, Bjørn

N1 - Publisher Copyright: Copyright © 2021 Steenstrup, Haumann, Kleber, Camarasa, Vuust and Petersen.

PY - 2021/10

Y1 - 2021/10

N2 - Classical musicians face a high demand for flawless and expressive performance, leading to highly intensified practice activity. Whereas the advantage of using mental strategies is well documented in sports research, few studies have explored the efficacy of mental imagery and overt singing on musical instrumental learning. In this study, 50 classically trained trumpet students performed short unfamiliar pieces. Performances were recorded before and after applying four prescribed practice strategies which were (1) physical practice, (2) mental imagery, (3) overt singing with optional use of solfege, (4) a combination of 1, 2 and 3 or a control condition, no practice. Three experts independently assessed pitch and rhythm accuracy, sound quality, intonation, and musical expression in all recordings. We found higher gains in the overall performance, as well as in pitch accuracy for the physical practice, and the combined practice strategies, compared to no practice. Furthermore, only the combined strategy yielded a significant improvement in musical expression. Pitch performance improvement was positively correlated with previous solfege training and frequent use of random practice strategies. The findings highlight benefits from applying practice strategies that complement physical practice in music instrument practice in short term early stages of learning a new piece. The study may generalize to other forms of learning, involving cognitive processes and motor skills.

AB - Classical musicians face a high demand for flawless and expressive performance, leading to highly intensified practice activity. Whereas the advantage of using mental strategies is well documented in sports research, few studies have explored the efficacy of mental imagery and overt singing on musical instrumental learning. In this study, 50 classically trained trumpet students performed short unfamiliar pieces. Performances were recorded before and after applying four prescribed practice strategies which were (1) physical practice, (2) mental imagery, (3) overt singing with optional use of solfege, (4) a combination of 1, 2 and 3 or a control condition, no practice. Three experts independently assessed pitch and rhythm accuracy, sound quality, intonation, and musical expression in all recordings. We found higher gains in the overall performance, as well as in pitch accuracy for the physical practice, and the combined practice strategies, compared to no practice. Furthermore, only the combined strategy yielded a significant improvement in musical expression. Pitch performance improvement was positively correlated with previous solfege training and frequent use of random practice strategies. The findings highlight benefits from applying practice strategies that complement physical practice in music instrument practice in short term early stages of learning a new piece. The study may generalize to other forms of learning, involving cognitive processes and motor skills.

KW - auditory imagery

KW - brass pedagogy

KW - deliberate practice

KW - interleaved/random practice

KW - motor imagery

KW - solfege

KW - trumpet

KW - varied practice

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85118755845&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.757052

DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2021.757052

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34759873

AN - SCOPUS:85118755845

VL - 12

JO - Frontiers in Psychology

JF - Frontiers in Psychology

SN - 1664-1078

M1 - 757052

ER -