Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Anders Hammerich Riis

Low-Dose Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Use and Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Population-Based, Case-Control Study

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

Low-Dose Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Use and Colorectal Cancer Risk : A Population-Based, Case-Control Study. / Friis, Søren; Riis, Anders H; Erichsen, Rune; Baron, John A; Sørensen, Henrik T.

In: Annals of Internal Medicine, Vol. 163, No. 5, 01.09.2015, p. 347-55.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{e1b13c541d45495ca9655f7d2f20b2ed,
title = "Low-Dose Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Use and Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Population-Based, Case-Control Study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: A recent comprehensive review concluded that additional research is needed to determine the optimal use of aspirin for cancer prevention.OBJECTIVE: To assess associations between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and colorectal cancer risk.DESIGN: Population-based, case-control study.SETTING: Northern Denmark.PATIENTS: Patients with first-time colorectal cancer in northern Denmark between 1994 and 2011. Population control participants were selected by risk set sampling.MEASUREMENTS: Data on drug use, comorbid conditions, and history of colonoscopy were obtained from prescription and patient registries. Use of low-dose aspirin (75 to 150 mg) and nonaspirin NSAIDs was defined according to type, estimated dose, duration, and consistency of use.RESULTS: Among 10 280 case patients and 102 800 control participants, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for colorectal cancer associated with ever use (≥2 prescriptions) of low-dose aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs were 1.03 (95% CI, 0.98 to 1.09) and 0.94 (CI, 0.90 to 0.98), respectively. Continuous long-term use (≥5 years) of low-dose aspirin was associated with a 27% reduction in colorectal cancer risk (OR, 0.73 [CI, 0.54 to 0.99]), whereas the overall OR for cumulative long-term use (continuous or noncontinuous) was close to unity. Nonaspirin NSAID use was associated with a substantial reduction in colorectal cancer risk, particularly for long-term, high-intensity use (average defined daily dose ≥0.3) of agents with high cyclooxygenase-2 selectivity (OR, 0.57 [CI, 0.44 to 0.74]).LIMITATIONS: Data were unavailable on over-the-counter purchases of high-dose aspirin and low-dose ibuprofen or NSAID dosing schedules, there were several comparisons, and the authors were unable to adjust for confounding by some risk factors.CONCLUSION: Long-term, continuous use of low-dose aspirin and long-term use of nonaspirin NSAIDs were associated with reduced colorectal cancer risk. Persons who continuously used low-dose aspirin comprised only a small proportion of the low-dose aspirin users.PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Danish Cancer Society, Aarhus University Research Foundation.",
author = "S{\o}ren Friis and Riis, {Anders H} and Rune Erichsen and Baron, {John A} and S{\o}rensen, {Henrik T}",
year = "2015",
month = sep,
day = "1",
doi = "10.7326/M15-0039",
language = "English",
volume = "163",
pages = "347--55",
journal = "Annals of Internal Medicine",
issn = "0003-4819",
publisher = "American College of Physicians",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Low-Dose Aspirin or Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Use and Colorectal Cancer Risk

T2 - A Population-Based, Case-Control Study

AU - Friis, Søren

AU - Riis, Anders H

AU - Erichsen, Rune

AU - Baron, John A

AU - Sørensen, Henrik T

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: A recent comprehensive review concluded that additional research is needed to determine the optimal use of aspirin for cancer prevention.OBJECTIVE: To assess associations between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and colorectal cancer risk.DESIGN: Population-based, case-control study.SETTING: Northern Denmark.PATIENTS: Patients with first-time colorectal cancer in northern Denmark between 1994 and 2011. Population control participants were selected by risk set sampling.MEASUREMENTS: Data on drug use, comorbid conditions, and history of colonoscopy were obtained from prescription and patient registries. Use of low-dose aspirin (75 to 150 mg) and nonaspirin NSAIDs was defined according to type, estimated dose, duration, and consistency of use.RESULTS: Among 10 280 case patients and 102 800 control participants, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for colorectal cancer associated with ever use (≥2 prescriptions) of low-dose aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs were 1.03 (95% CI, 0.98 to 1.09) and 0.94 (CI, 0.90 to 0.98), respectively. Continuous long-term use (≥5 years) of low-dose aspirin was associated with a 27% reduction in colorectal cancer risk (OR, 0.73 [CI, 0.54 to 0.99]), whereas the overall OR for cumulative long-term use (continuous or noncontinuous) was close to unity. Nonaspirin NSAID use was associated with a substantial reduction in colorectal cancer risk, particularly for long-term, high-intensity use (average defined daily dose ≥0.3) of agents with high cyclooxygenase-2 selectivity (OR, 0.57 [CI, 0.44 to 0.74]).LIMITATIONS: Data were unavailable on over-the-counter purchases of high-dose aspirin and low-dose ibuprofen or NSAID dosing schedules, there were several comparisons, and the authors were unable to adjust for confounding by some risk factors.CONCLUSION: Long-term, continuous use of low-dose aspirin and long-term use of nonaspirin NSAIDs were associated with reduced colorectal cancer risk. Persons who continuously used low-dose aspirin comprised only a small proportion of the low-dose aspirin users.PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Danish Cancer Society, Aarhus University Research Foundation.

AB - BACKGROUND: A recent comprehensive review concluded that additional research is needed to determine the optimal use of aspirin for cancer prevention.OBJECTIVE: To assess associations between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and colorectal cancer risk.DESIGN: Population-based, case-control study.SETTING: Northern Denmark.PATIENTS: Patients with first-time colorectal cancer in northern Denmark between 1994 and 2011. Population control participants were selected by risk set sampling.MEASUREMENTS: Data on drug use, comorbid conditions, and history of colonoscopy were obtained from prescription and patient registries. Use of low-dose aspirin (75 to 150 mg) and nonaspirin NSAIDs was defined according to type, estimated dose, duration, and consistency of use.RESULTS: Among 10 280 case patients and 102 800 control participants, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for colorectal cancer associated with ever use (≥2 prescriptions) of low-dose aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs were 1.03 (95% CI, 0.98 to 1.09) and 0.94 (CI, 0.90 to 0.98), respectively. Continuous long-term use (≥5 years) of low-dose aspirin was associated with a 27% reduction in colorectal cancer risk (OR, 0.73 [CI, 0.54 to 0.99]), whereas the overall OR for cumulative long-term use (continuous or noncontinuous) was close to unity. Nonaspirin NSAID use was associated with a substantial reduction in colorectal cancer risk, particularly for long-term, high-intensity use (average defined daily dose ≥0.3) of agents with high cyclooxygenase-2 selectivity (OR, 0.57 [CI, 0.44 to 0.74]).LIMITATIONS: Data were unavailable on over-the-counter purchases of high-dose aspirin and low-dose ibuprofen or NSAID dosing schedules, there were several comparisons, and the authors were unable to adjust for confounding by some risk factors.CONCLUSION: Long-term, continuous use of low-dose aspirin and long-term use of nonaspirin NSAIDs were associated with reduced colorectal cancer risk. Persons who continuously used low-dose aspirin comprised only a small proportion of the low-dose aspirin users.PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Danish Cancer Society, Aarhus University Research Foundation.

U2 - 10.7326/M15-0039

DO - 10.7326/M15-0039

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26302241

VL - 163

SP - 347

EP - 355

JO - Annals of Internal Medicine

JF - Annals of Internal Medicine

SN - 0003-4819

IS - 5

ER -