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Anders Hammerich Riis

Impact of COPD on outcome among patients with complicated peptic ulcer.

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Impact of COPD on outcome among patients with complicated peptic ulcer. / Christensen, Steffen; Thomsen, Reimar W; Tørring, Marie Louise; Riis, Anders; Nørgaard, Mette; Sørensen, Henrik T.

In: Chest, Vol. 133, No. 6, 2008, p. 1360-6.

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@article{d945a6c0736311ddb7fc000ea68e967b,
title = "Impact of COPD on outcome among patients with complicated peptic ulcer.",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: COPD is associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease, but limited data exist on whether COPD influences short-term mortality among patients with bleeding and a perforated peptic ulcer. We examined the association between COPD and 30-day mortality following bleeding and perforation of a peptic ulcer. METHODS: We identified all patients who had been hospitalized with a first-time diagnosis of peptic ulcer perforation (n = 2,033) or bleeding (n = 7,486) in northern Denmark between 1991 and 2004. Information on COPD, comorbidities, and filled prescriptions was obtained from medical databases. Mortality was ascertained using the Danish Civil Registration System. We computed the cumulative 30-day mortality rates for ulcer patients with COPD and for other ulcer patients, and used regression analysis to obtain the 30-day mortality rate ratios (MRRs), controlling for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Among patients who were hospitalized with perforated peptic ulcers, 218 (10.7%) had previously been hospitalized with COPD. The 30-day mortality rate was 44.0% among perforated ulcer patients with COPD vs 25.5% among other ulcer patients (adjusted MRR, 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18 to 1.85). Among patients hospitalized with a bleeding peptic ulcer, 759 (10.1%) had previously been hospitalized with COPD. The 30-day mortality rate was 16.5% among bleeding peptic ulcer patients with COPD vs 10.8% among other ulcer patients (adjusted MRR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.68). The use of oral glucocorticoids among COPD patients was associated with higher MRRs for both perforated and bleeding peptic ulcers. CONCLUSIONS: COPD substantially increased 30-day mortality among patients with bleeding and perforated peptic ulcers.",
keywords = "Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Confidence Intervals, Denmark, Female, Glucocorticoids, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage, Peptic Ulcer Perforation, Population Surveillance, Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive, Registries, Severity of Illness Index",
author = "Steffen Christensen and Thomsen, {Reimar W} and T{\o}rring, {Marie Louise} and Anders Riis and Mette N{\o}rgaard and S{\o}rensen, {Henrik T}",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1378/chest.07-2543",
language = "English",
volume = "133",
pages = "1360--6",
journal = "Chest",
issn = "0012-3692",
publisher = "AMER COLL CHEST PHYSICIANS",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of COPD on outcome among patients with complicated peptic ulcer.

AU - Christensen, Steffen

AU - Thomsen, Reimar W

AU - Tørring, Marie Louise

AU - Riis, Anders

AU - Nørgaard, Mette

AU - Sørensen, Henrik T

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - BACKGROUND: COPD is associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease, but limited data exist on whether COPD influences short-term mortality among patients with bleeding and a perforated peptic ulcer. We examined the association between COPD and 30-day mortality following bleeding and perforation of a peptic ulcer. METHODS: We identified all patients who had been hospitalized with a first-time diagnosis of peptic ulcer perforation (n = 2,033) or bleeding (n = 7,486) in northern Denmark between 1991 and 2004. Information on COPD, comorbidities, and filled prescriptions was obtained from medical databases. Mortality was ascertained using the Danish Civil Registration System. We computed the cumulative 30-day mortality rates for ulcer patients with COPD and for other ulcer patients, and used regression analysis to obtain the 30-day mortality rate ratios (MRRs), controlling for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Among patients who were hospitalized with perforated peptic ulcers, 218 (10.7%) had previously been hospitalized with COPD. The 30-day mortality rate was 44.0% among perforated ulcer patients with COPD vs 25.5% among other ulcer patients (adjusted MRR, 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18 to 1.85). Among patients hospitalized with a bleeding peptic ulcer, 759 (10.1%) had previously been hospitalized with COPD. The 30-day mortality rate was 16.5% among bleeding peptic ulcer patients with COPD vs 10.8% among other ulcer patients (adjusted MRR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.68). The use of oral glucocorticoids among COPD patients was associated with higher MRRs for both perforated and bleeding peptic ulcers. CONCLUSIONS: COPD substantially increased 30-day mortality among patients with bleeding and perforated peptic ulcers.

AB - BACKGROUND: COPD is associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease, but limited data exist on whether COPD influences short-term mortality among patients with bleeding and a perforated peptic ulcer. We examined the association between COPD and 30-day mortality following bleeding and perforation of a peptic ulcer. METHODS: We identified all patients who had been hospitalized with a first-time diagnosis of peptic ulcer perforation (n = 2,033) or bleeding (n = 7,486) in northern Denmark between 1991 and 2004. Information on COPD, comorbidities, and filled prescriptions was obtained from medical databases. Mortality was ascertained using the Danish Civil Registration System. We computed the cumulative 30-day mortality rates for ulcer patients with COPD and for other ulcer patients, and used regression analysis to obtain the 30-day mortality rate ratios (MRRs), controlling for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Among patients who were hospitalized with perforated peptic ulcers, 218 (10.7%) had previously been hospitalized with COPD. The 30-day mortality rate was 44.0% among perforated ulcer patients with COPD vs 25.5% among other ulcer patients (adjusted MRR, 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18 to 1.85). Among patients hospitalized with a bleeding peptic ulcer, 759 (10.1%) had previously been hospitalized with COPD. The 30-day mortality rate was 16.5% among bleeding peptic ulcer patients with COPD vs 10.8% among other ulcer patients (adjusted MRR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.68). The use of oral glucocorticoids among COPD patients was associated with higher MRRs for both perforated and bleeding peptic ulcers. CONCLUSIONS: COPD substantially increased 30-day mortality among patients with bleeding and perforated peptic ulcers.

KW - Aged

KW - Aged, 80 and over

KW - Confidence Intervals

KW - Denmark

KW - Female

KW - Glucocorticoids

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage

KW - Peptic Ulcer Perforation

KW - Population Surveillance

KW - Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive

KW - Registries

KW - Severity of Illness Index

U2 - 10.1378/chest.07-2543

DO - 10.1378/chest.07-2543

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 18339786

VL - 133

SP - 1360

EP - 1366

JO - Chest

JF - Chest

SN - 0012-3692

IS - 6

ER -