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Anders Hammerich Riis

Folic acid supplementation and fecundability: a Danish prospective cohort study

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Folic acid supplementation and fecundability : a Danish prospective cohort study. / Cueto, H T; Riis, A H; Hatch, E E; Wise, L A; Rothman, K J; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Mikkelsen, Ellen Margrethe.

In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 70, No. 1, 01.2016, p. 66-71.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Cueto, HT, Riis, AH, Hatch, EE, Wise, LA, Rothman, KJ, Sørensen, HT & Mikkelsen, EM 2016, 'Folic acid supplementation and fecundability: a Danish prospective cohort study', European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 70, no. 1, pp. 66-71. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2015.94

APA

Cueto, H. T., Riis, A. H., Hatch, E. E., Wise, L. A., Rothman, K. J., Sørensen, H. T., & Mikkelsen, E. M. (2016). Folic acid supplementation and fecundability: a Danish prospective cohort study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 70(1), 66-71. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2015.94

CBE

Cueto HT, Riis AH, Hatch EE, Wise LA, Rothman KJ, Sørensen HT, Mikkelsen EM. 2016. Folic acid supplementation and fecundability: a Danish prospective cohort study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 70(1):66-71. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2015.94

MLA

Cueto, H T et al. "Folic acid supplementation and fecundability: a Danish prospective cohort study". European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2016, 70(1). 66-71. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2015.94

Vancouver

Cueto HT, Riis AH, Hatch EE, Wise LA, Rothman KJ, Sørensen HT et al. Folic acid supplementation and fecundability: a Danish prospective cohort study. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2016 Jan;70(1):66-71. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2015.94

Author

Cueto, H T ; Riis, A H ; Hatch, E E ; Wise, L A ; Rothman, K J ; Sørensen, Henrik Toft ; Mikkelsen, Ellen Margrethe. / Folic acid supplementation and fecundability : a Danish prospective cohort study. In: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2016 ; Vol. 70, No. 1. pp. 66-71.

Bibtex

@article{97889a7a338044d1a797ab8b5540ecb9,
title = "Folic acid supplementation and fecundability: a Danish prospective cohort study",
abstract = "BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Periconceptional folic acid (FA) supplementation reduces the risk of neural tube defects and has been associated with ovulatory function. However, only two studies have associated supplementation with multivitamins (MVs) that contained FA with increased pregnancy rates. We aimed to examine the association between FA supplementation (obtained either through single FA tablets or through MVs) and fecundability.SUBJECTS/METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 3895 Danish women who were planning a pregnancy between 2007 and 2011. We estimated fecundability ratios (FRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in relation to FA supplementation (either through single FA tablets or MV) using a proportional probabilities regression model, with adjustment for potential socio-demographic, reproductive and lifestyle confounders. In stratified analyses, we also estimated FR with 95% CI in relation to FA supplementation for women with regular and irregular cycles, respectively, and for women with short (<27 days), medium (27-29 days) and long cycles (⩾30 days), respectively.RESULTS: FA supplementation was associated with increased fecundability (FR=1.15, 95% CI=1.06-1.25), compared with non-use. The adjusted FRs for FA supplement use relative to non-use were 1.35 (95% CI=1.12-1.65) and 1.11 (95% CI=1.01-1.22) for women with irregular and regular cycles, respectively, and 1.36 (95% CI=0.95-1.95), 1.10 (95% CI=0.98-1.22) and 1.24 (95% CI=1.10-1.41) for women with short (<27 days), medium (27-29 days) and long cycles (⩾30 days), respectively.CONCLUSIONS: FA supplementation was associated with increased fecundability, and this association appeared to be stronger among women with irregular cycles and among women with either short or long cycle length.",
keywords = "Adult, Denmark, Dietary Supplements, Female, Fertility, Folic Acid, Humans, Menstrual Cycle, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Rate, Prospective Studies, Reproduction, Vitamins, Journal Article",
author = "Cueto, {H T} and Riis, {A H} and Hatch, {E E} and Wise, {L A} and Rothman, {K J} and S{\o}rensen, {Henrik Toft} and Mikkelsen, {Ellen Margrethe}",
year = "2016",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1038/ejcn.2015.94",
language = "English",
volume = "70",
pages = "66--71",
journal = "European Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0954-3007",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Folic acid supplementation and fecundability

T2 - a Danish prospective cohort study

AU - Cueto, H T

AU - Riis, A H

AU - Hatch, E E

AU - Wise, L A

AU - Rothman, K J

AU - Sørensen, Henrik Toft

AU - Mikkelsen, Ellen Margrethe

PY - 2016/1

Y1 - 2016/1

N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Periconceptional folic acid (FA) supplementation reduces the risk of neural tube defects and has been associated with ovulatory function. However, only two studies have associated supplementation with multivitamins (MVs) that contained FA with increased pregnancy rates. We aimed to examine the association between FA supplementation (obtained either through single FA tablets or through MVs) and fecundability.SUBJECTS/METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 3895 Danish women who were planning a pregnancy between 2007 and 2011. We estimated fecundability ratios (FRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in relation to FA supplementation (either through single FA tablets or MV) using a proportional probabilities regression model, with adjustment for potential socio-demographic, reproductive and lifestyle confounders. In stratified analyses, we also estimated FR with 95% CI in relation to FA supplementation for women with regular and irregular cycles, respectively, and for women with short (<27 days), medium (27-29 days) and long cycles (⩾30 days), respectively.RESULTS: FA supplementation was associated with increased fecundability (FR=1.15, 95% CI=1.06-1.25), compared with non-use. The adjusted FRs for FA supplement use relative to non-use were 1.35 (95% CI=1.12-1.65) and 1.11 (95% CI=1.01-1.22) for women with irregular and regular cycles, respectively, and 1.36 (95% CI=0.95-1.95), 1.10 (95% CI=0.98-1.22) and 1.24 (95% CI=1.10-1.41) for women with short (<27 days), medium (27-29 days) and long cycles (⩾30 days), respectively.CONCLUSIONS: FA supplementation was associated with increased fecundability, and this association appeared to be stronger among women with irregular cycles and among women with either short or long cycle length.

AB - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Periconceptional folic acid (FA) supplementation reduces the risk of neural tube defects and has been associated with ovulatory function. However, only two studies have associated supplementation with multivitamins (MVs) that contained FA with increased pregnancy rates. We aimed to examine the association between FA supplementation (obtained either through single FA tablets or through MVs) and fecundability.SUBJECTS/METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 3895 Danish women who were planning a pregnancy between 2007 and 2011. We estimated fecundability ratios (FRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in relation to FA supplementation (either through single FA tablets or MV) using a proportional probabilities regression model, with adjustment for potential socio-demographic, reproductive and lifestyle confounders. In stratified analyses, we also estimated FR with 95% CI in relation to FA supplementation for women with regular and irregular cycles, respectively, and for women with short (<27 days), medium (27-29 days) and long cycles (⩾30 days), respectively.RESULTS: FA supplementation was associated with increased fecundability (FR=1.15, 95% CI=1.06-1.25), compared with non-use. The adjusted FRs for FA supplement use relative to non-use were 1.35 (95% CI=1.12-1.65) and 1.11 (95% CI=1.01-1.22) for women with irregular and regular cycles, respectively, and 1.36 (95% CI=0.95-1.95), 1.10 (95% CI=0.98-1.22) and 1.24 (95% CI=1.10-1.41) for women with short (<27 days), medium (27-29 days) and long cycles (⩾30 days), respectively.CONCLUSIONS: FA supplementation was associated with increased fecundability, and this association appeared to be stronger among women with irregular cycles and among women with either short or long cycle length.

KW - Adult

KW - Denmark

KW - Dietary Supplements

KW - Female

KW - Fertility

KW - Folic Acid

KW - Humans

KW - Menstrual Cycle

KW - Pregnancy

KW - Pregnancy Rate

KW - Prospective Studies

KW - Reproduction

KW - Vitamins

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1038/ejcn.2015.94

DO - 10.1038/ejcn.2015.94

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26081493

VL - 70

SP - 66

EP - 71

JO - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0954-3007

IS - 1

ER -