Aarhus University Seal

Anders Hammerich Riis

A successful implementation of e-epidemiology: the Danish pregnancy planning study 'Snart-Gravid'

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Standard

A successful implementation of e-epidemiology: the Danish pregnancy planning study 'Snart-Gravid'. / Huybrechts, Krista F; Mikkelsen, Ellen M; Christensen, Tina et al.

In: European Journal of Epidemiology, Vol. 25, No. 5, 2010, p. 297-304.

Research output: Contribution to journal/Conference contribution in journal/Contribution to newspaperJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Huybrechts KF, Mikkelsen EM, Christensen T, Riis A, Hatch EE, Wise LA et al. A successful implementation of e-epidemiology: the Danish pregnancy planning study 'Snart-Gravid'. European Journal of Epidemiology. 2010;25(5):297-304. doi: 10.1007/s10654-010-9431-y

Author

Huybrechts, Krista F ; Mikkelsen, Ellen M ; Christensen, Tina et al. / A successful implementation of e-epidemiology: the Danish pregnancy planning study 'Snart-Gravid'. In: European Journal of Epidemiology. 2010 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 297-304.

Bibtex

@article{147fefa0640f11df8bd0000ea68e967b,
title = "A successful implementation of e-epidemiology: the Danish pregnancy planning study 'Snart-Gravid'",
abstract = "The attraction of being able to use the internet for the recruitment of an epidemiologic cohort stems mainly from cost efficiency and convenience. The pregnancy planning study ('Snart-Gravid')-a prospective cohort study of Danish women planning a pregnancy-was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and cost efficiency of using internet-based recruitment and follow-up. Feasibility was assessed by examining patient accrual data over time, questionnaire-specific response rates and losses to follow-up. The relative cost efficiency was examined by comparing the study costs with those of an alternative non internet-based study approach. The target recruitment of 2,500 participants over 6 months was achieved using advertisements on a health-related website, supported by a coordinated media strategy at study initiation. Questionnaire cycle-specific response rates ranged from 87 to 90% over the 12-month follow-up. At 6 months, 87% of women had a known outcome or were still under follow-up; at 12 months the figure was 82%. The study cost of $400,000 ($160 per enrolled subject) compared favorably with the estimated cost to conduct the same study using a conventional non-internet based approach ($322 per subject). The gain in efficiency with the internet-based approach appeared to be even more substantial with longer follow-up and larger study sizes. The successful conduct of this pilot study suggests that the internet may be a useful tool to recruit and follow subjects in prospective cohort studies.",
author = "Huybrechts, {Krista F} and Mikkelsen, {Ellen M} and Tina Christensen and Anders Riis and Hatch, {Elizabeth E} and Wise, {Lauren A} and S{\o}rensen, {Henrik Toft} and Rothman, {Kenneth J}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1007/s10654-010-9431-y",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "297--304",
journal = "European Journal of Epidemiology",
issn = "0393-2990",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A successful implementation of e-epidemiology: the Danish pregnancy planning study 'Snart-Gravid'

AU - Huybrechts, Krista F

AU - Mikkelsen, Ellen M

AU - Christensen, Tina

AU - Riis, Anders

AU - Hatch, Elizabeth E

AU - Wise, Lauren A

AU - Sørensen, Henrik Toft

AU - Rothman, Kenneth J

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - The attraction of being able to use the internet for the recruitment of an epidemiologic cohort stems mainly from cost efficiency and convenience. The pregnancy planning study ('Snart-Gravid')-a prospective cohort study of Danish women planning a pregnancy-was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and cost efficiency of using internet-based recruitment and follow-up. Feasibility was assessed by examining patient accrual data over time, questionnaire-specific response rates and losses to follow-up. The relative cost efficiency was examined by comparing the study costs with those of an alternative non internet-based study approach. The target recruitment of 2,500 participants over 6 months was achieved using advertisements on a health-related website, supported by a coordinated media strategy at study initiation. Questionnaire cycle-specific response rates ranged from 87 to 90% over the 12-month follow-up. At 6 months, 87% of women had a known outcome or were still under follow-up; at 12 months the figure was 82%. The study cost of $400,000 ($160 per enrolled subject) compared favorably with the estimated cost to conduct the same study using a conventional non-internet based approach ($322 per subject). The gain in efficiency with the internet-based approach appeared to be even more substantial with longer follow-up and larger study sizes. The successful conduct of this pilot study suggests that the internet may be a useful tool to recruit and follow subjects in prospective cohort studies.

AB - The attraction of being able to use the internet for the recruitment of an epidemiologic cohort stems mainly from cost efficiency and convenience. The pregnancy planning study ('Snart-Gravid')-a prospective cohort study of Danish women planning a pregnancy-was conducted to evaluate the feasibility and cost efficiency of using internet-based recruitment and follow-up. Feasibility was assessed by examining patient accrual data over time, questionnaire-specific response rates and losses to follow-up. The relative cost efficiency was examined by comparing the study costs with those of an alternative non internet-based study approach. The target recruitment of 2,500 participants over 6 months was achieved using advertisements on a health-related website, supported by a coordinated media strategy at study initiation. Questionnaire cycle-specific response rates ranged from 87 to 90% over the 12-month follow-up. At 6 months, 87% of women had a known outcome or were still under follow-up; at 12 months the figure was 82%. The study cost of $400,000 ($160 per enrolled subject) compared favorably with the estimated cost to conduct the same study using a conventional non-internet based approach ($322 per subject). The gain in efficiency with the internet-based approach appeared to be even more substantial with longer follow-up and larger study sizes. The successful conduct of this pilot study suggests that the internet may be a useful tool to recruit and follow subjects in prospective cohort studies.

U2 - 10.1007/s10654-010-9431-y

DO - 10.1007/s10654-010-9431-y

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 20148289

VL - 25

SP - 297

EP - 304

JO - European Journal of Epidemiology

JF - European Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0393-2990

IS - 5

ER -