Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

Word classes

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Standard

Word classes. / Rijkhoff, Jan.

I: Language and Linguistics Compass, Bind 1, Nr. 6, 2007, s. 709-726.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Rijkhoff, J 2007, 'Word classes', Language and Linguistics Compass, bind 1, nr. 6, s. 709-726.

APA

Rijkhoff, J. (2007). Word classes. Language and Linguistics Compass, 1(6), 709-726.

CBE

Rijkhoff J. 2007. Word classes. Language and Linguistics Compass. 1(6):709-726.

MLA

Rijkhoff, Jan. "Word classes". Language and Linguistics Compass. 2007, 1(6). 709-726.

Vancouver

Rijkhoff J. Word classes. Language and Linguistics Compass. 2007;1(6):709-726.

Author

Rijkhoff, Jan. / Word classes. I: Language and Linguistics Compass. 2007 ; Bind 1, Nr. 6. s. 709-726.

Bibtex

@article{486bc930975511dcbee902004c4f4f50,
title = "Word classes",
abstract = "This article provides an overview of recent literature and research on word classes, focusing in particular on typological approaches to word classification. The cross-linguistic classification of word class systems (or parts-of-speech systems) presented in this article is based on statements found in grammatical descriptions of some 50 languages, which together constitute a representative sample of the world{\textquoteright}s languages (Hengeveld et al. 2004: 529). It appears that there are both quantitative and qualitative differences between word class systems of individual languages. Whereas some languages employ a parts-of-speech system that includes the categories Verb, Noun, Adjective and Adverb, other languages may use only a subset of these four lexical categories. Furthermore, quite a few languages have a major word class whose members cannot be classified in terms of the categories Verb – Noun – Adjective – Adverb, because they have properties that are strongly associated with at least two of these four traditional word classes (e.g. Adjective and Adverb). Finally, this article discusses some of the ways in which word class distinctions interact with other grammatical domains, such as syntax and morphology.",
keywords = "verb, noun, adjective, rigid word class, flexible word class",
author = "Jan Rijkhoff",
note = "Paper id:: doi:10.1111/j.1749-818X.2007.00030.x",
year = "2007",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "709--726",
journal = "Language and Linguistics Compass",
issn = "1749-818X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Word classes

AU - Rijkhoff, Jan

N1 - Paper id:: doi:10.1111/j.1749-818X.2007.00030.x

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - This article provides an overview of recent literature and research on word classes, focusing in particular on typological approaches to word classification. The cross-linguistic classification of word class systems (or parts-of-speech systems) presented in this article is based on statements found in grammatical descriptions of some 50 languages, which together constitute a representative sample of the world’s languages (Hengeveld et al. 2004: 529). It appears that there are both quantitative and qualitative differences between word class systems of individual languages. Whereas some languages employ a parts-of-speech system that includes the categories Verb, Noun, Adjective and Adverb, other languages may use only a subset of these four lexical categories. Furthermore, quite a few languages have a major word class whose members cannot be classified in terms of the categories Verb – Noun – Adjective – Adverb, because they have properties that are strongly associated with at least two of these four traditional word classes (e.g. Adjective and Adverb). Finally, this article discusses some of the ways in which word class distinctions interact with other grammatical domains, such as syntax and morphology.

AB - This article provides an overview of recent literature and research on word classes, focusing in particular on typological approaches to word classification. The cross-linguistic classification of word class systems (or parts-of-speech systems) presented in this article is based on statements found in grammatical descriptions of some 50 languages, which together constitute a representative sample of the world’s languages (Hengeveld et al. 2004: 529). It appears that there are both quantitative and qualitative differences between word class systems of individual languages. Whereas some languages employ a parts-of-speech system that includes the categories Verb, Noun, Adjective and Adverb, other languages may use only a subset of these four lexical categories. Furthermore, quite a few languages have a major word class whose members cannot be classified in terms of the categories Verb – Noun – Adjective – Adverb, because they have properties that are strongly associated with at least two of these four traditional word classes (e.g. Adjective and Adverb). Finally, this article discusses some of the ways in which word class distinctions interact with other grammatical domains, such as syntax and morphology.

KW - verb, noun, adjective, rigid word class, flexible word class

M3 - Journal article

VL - 1

SP - 709

EP - 726

JO - Language and Linguistics Compass

JF - Language and Linguistics Compass

SN - 1749-818X

IS - 6

ER -