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Tough Luck and Tough Choices: Applying Luck Egalitarianism to Oral Health

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Tough Luck and Tough Choices: Applying Luck Egalitarianism to Oral Health. / Albertsen, Andreas.

I: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, Bind 40, Nr. 3, 2015, s. 342-362.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Albertsen, Andreas. / Tough Luck and Tough Choices: Applying Luck Egalitarianism to Oral Health. I: Journal of Medicine and Philosophy. 2015 ; Bind 40, Nr. 3. s. 342-362.

Bibtex

@article{f38b73b1f02c4042a0b9c883a68c750c,
title = "Tough Luck and Tough Choices: Applying Luck Egalitarianism to Oral Health",
abstract = "Luck egalitarianism is often taken to task for its alleged harsh implications. For example, it may seem to imply a policy of nonassistance toward uninsured reckless drivers who suffer injuries. Luck egalitarians respond to such objections partly by pointing to a number of factors pertaining to the cases being debated, which suggests that their stance is less inattentive to the plight of the victims than it might seem at first. However, the strategy leaves some cases in which the attribution of individual responsibility is appropriate (and so, it seems, is asking people to pick up the tab for their choices). One such case is oral health or significant aspects of this. It is appropriate, the paper argues, to hold people responsible for a number of factors that affect their oral health. A luck egalitarian approach inspired by John Roemer can assess whether people have acted responsibly by comparing their choices to those of their peers. A luck egalitarian approach to oral health would recommend prioritizing scarce resources in a responsibility-weighted queuing system and include copayment and general taxation among its measures of financing.",
keywords = "luck egalitarianism, health inequalities, Shlomi Segall, oral health, dentistry, distributive justice, distributive justice in health",
author = "Andreas Albertsen",
note = "{\textcopyright} The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1093/jmp/jhv001",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "342--362",
journal = "Journal of Medicine and Philosophy",
issn = "0360-5310",
publisher = "Oxford Academic",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tough Luck and Tough Choices: Applying Luck Egalitarianism to Oral Health

AU - Albertsen, Andreas

N1 - © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Luck egalitarianism is often taken to task for its alleged harsh implications. For example, it may seem to imply a policy of nonassistance toward uninsured reckless drivers who suffer injuries. Luck egalitarians respond to such objections partly by pointing to a number of factors pertaining to the cases being debated, which suggests that their stance is less inattentive to the plight of the victims than it might seem at first. However, the strategy leaves some cases in which the attribution of individual responsibility is appropriate (and so, it seems, is asking people to pick up the tab for their choices). One such case is oral health or significant aspects of this. It is appropriate, the paper argues, to hold people responsible for a number of factors that affect their oral health. A luck egalitarian approach inspired by John Roemer can assess whether people have acted responsibly by comparing their choices to those of their peers. A luck egalitarian approach to oral health would recommend prioritizing scarce resources in a responsibility-weighted queuing system and include copayment and general taxation among its measures of financing.

AB - Luck egalitarianism is often taken to task for its alleged harsh implications. For example, it may seem to imply a policy of nonassistance toward uninsured reckless drivers who suffer injuries. Luck egalitarians respond to such objections partly by pointing to a number of factors pertaining to the cases being debated, which suggests that their stance is less inattentive to the plight of the victims than it might seem at first. However, the strategy leaves some cases in which the attribution of individual responsibility is appropriate (and so, it seems, is asking people to pick up the tab for their choices). One such case is oral health or significant aspects of this. It is appropriate, the paper argues, to hold people responsible for a number of factors that affect their oral health. A luck egalitarian approach inspired by John Roemer can assess whether people have acted responsibly by comparing their choices to those of their peers. A luck egalitarian approach to oral health would recommend prioritizing scarce resources in a responsibility-weighted queuing system and include copayment and general taxation among its measures of financing.

KW - luck egalitarianism

KW - health inequalities

KW - Shlomi Segall

KW - oral health

KW - dentistry

KW - distributive justice

KW - distributive justice in health

U2 - 10.1093/jmp/jhv001

DO - 10.1093/jmp/jhv001

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25870307

VL - 40

SP - 342

EP - 362

JO - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy

JF - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy

SN - 0360-5310

IS - 3

ER -