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The protein composition of the digestive fluid from the Venus flytrap sheds light on prey digestion mechanisms

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  • Waltraud X Schulze, Max Planck Institut für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie, Tyskland
  • Kristian Wejse Sanggaard, Danmark
  • Ines Kreuzer, Department of Molecular Plant Physiology & Biophysics, Universität Würzburg, Tyskland
  • Anders D Knudsen, Danmark
  • Felix Bemm, Department of Bioinformatics, Biozentrum, Am Hubland, Universität Würzburg, Tyskland
  • Ida B Thøgersen
  • Andrea Brautigam, Department of Plant Biochemistry, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Tyskland
  • Line R Thomsen, Danmark
  • Simon Schliesky, Department of Plant Biochemistry, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Tyskland
  • Thomas Franck Dyrlund, Danmark
  • Maria Escalante-Perez, Department of Molecular Plant Physiology & Biophysics, Universität Würzburg, Tyskland
  • Dirk Becker, Department of Molecular Plant Physiology & Biophysics, Universität Würzburg, Tyskland
  • Jörg Schultz, Department of Bioinformatics, Biozentrum, Am Hubland, Universität Würzburg, Tyskland
  • Henrik Karring, University of Southern Denmark, Institute of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology, Danmark
  • Andreas Weber, Department of Plant Biochemistry, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Tyskland
  • Peter Højrup, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Danmark
  • Rainer Hedrich, Department of Molecular Plant Physiology & Biophysics, Universität Würzburg, Tyskland
  • Jan Johannes Enghild
The Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula) is one of the most well-known carnivorous plants because of its unique ability to capture small animals, usually insects or spiders, through a unique snap-trapping mechanism. The animals are subsequently killed and digested to assimilate nutrients as the plants grow in mineral-deficient soils. We deep sequenced the cDNA from Dionaea traps to obtain transcript libraries, which were used in the mass spectrometry-based identification of the proteins secreted during digestion. The identified proteins consisted of peroxidases, nucleases, phosphatases, phospholipases, a glucanase, chitinases, and proteolytic enzymes, including four cysteine proteases, two aspartic proteases, and a serine carboxypeptidase. The majority of the most abundant proteins were categorized as pathogenesis-related proteins, suggesting that the plant's digestive system evolved from defense-related processes. This in-depth characterization of a highly specialized secreted fluid from a carnivorous plant provides new information about its prey digestion mechanism and the evolutionary processes driving its defense pathways and nutrient acquisition.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftMolecular and Cellular Proteomics
Vol/bind11
Nummer11
Sider (fra-til)1306-1319
Antal sider14
ISSN1535-9476
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 nov. 2012

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