Aarhus University Seal / Aarhus Universitets segl

The Extent of Myocardial Injury During Prolonged Targeted Temperature Management After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

AIM: The aim of this study is to evaluate the extent of myocardial injury by cardiac biomarkers during prolonged targeted temperature management of 24 hours vs 48 hours after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

METHODS: This randomized Scandinavian multicenter study compares the extent of myocardial injury quantified by area under the curve (AUC) of cardiac biomarkers during prolonged targeted temperature management at 33°C ± 1°C of 24 hours and 48 hours, respectively. Through a period of 2.5 years, 161 comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients were randomized to targeted temperature management for 24 hours (n = 77) or 48 hours (n = 84). The AUC was calculated using both high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnTAUC) and creatine kinase-myocardial band (CK-MBAUC) that were based upon measurements of these biomarkers every 6 hours upon admission until 96 hours after reaching target temperature.

RESULTS: The median hs-cTnTAUC of 33,827 ng/L/h (interquartile range [IQR] 11,366-117,690) of targeted temperature management at 24 hours did not differ significantly from that of 28,973 ng/L/h (IQR 10,656-163,655) at 48 hours. In contrast, the median CK-MBAUC of 1829 μg/L/h (IQR 800-6799) during targeted temperature management at 24 hours was significantly lower than that of 2428 μg/L/h (IQR 1163-10,906) within targeted temperature management at 48 hours, P <.05.

CONCLUSION: This study of comatose out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survivors showed no difference between the extents of myocardial injury estimated by hs-cTnTAUC of prolonged targeted temperature management of 48 hours vs 24 hours, although the CK-MBAUC was significantly higher during 48 hours vs 24 hours. Hence, it seems unlikely that the duration of targeted temperature management has a beneficial effect on the extent of myocardial injury after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and may even have a worsening effect.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe American Journal of Medicine
Vol/bind130
Nummer1
Sider (fra-til)37-46
ISSN0002-9343
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2017

Se relationer på Aarhus Universitet Citationsformater

ID: 102297362