The emotional impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on individuals with progressive multiple sclerosis

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  • Nancy D Chiaravalloti, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Kessler Foundation
  • ,
  • Maria Pia Amato, University of Florence, Florence, IRCCS Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi - Milano
  • ,
  • Giampaolo Brichetto, Italian Multiple Sclerosis Society, Italian Multiple Sclerosis Foundation
  • ,
  • Jeremy Chataway, London Ctr Nanotechnol, University College London, University of London
  • ,
  • Ulrik Dalgas
  • John DeLuca, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Kessler Foundation
  • ,
  • Cecilia Meza, University of Toronto and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
  • ,
  • Nancy B Moore, Kessler Foundation
  • ,
  • Peter Feys, Univ Hasselt, Hasselt University
  • ,
  • Massimo Filippi, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Department of Pathology, IRCSS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
  • ,
  • Jennifer Freeman, University of Plymouth
  • ,
  • Matilde Inglese, University of Genoa, Ospedale Policlinico San Martino
  • ,
  • Rob Motl, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • ,
  • Maria Assunta Rocca, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Department of Pathology, IRCSS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy.
  • ,
  • Brian M Sandroff, Kessler Foundation, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • ,
  • Amber Salter, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA.
  • ,
  • Gary Cutter, University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • ,
  • Anthony Feinstein, University of Toronto and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre
  • ,
  • CogEx Research Team

OBJECTIVE: Individuals with pre-existing chronic illness have shown increased anxiety and depression due to COVID-19. Here, we examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on emotional symptomatology and quality of life in individuals with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (PMS).

METHODS: Data were obtained during a randomized clinical trial on rehabilitation taking place at 11 centers in North America and Europe. Participants included 131 individuals with PMS. Study procedures were interrupted in accordance with governmental restrictions as COVID-19 spread. During study closure, a COVID Impact Survey was administered via telephone or email to all participants, along with measures of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, quality of life, and MS symptomatology that were previously administered pre-pandemic.

RESULTS: 4% of respondents reported COVID-19 infection. No significant changes were noted in anxiety, quality of life, or the impact of MS symptomatology on daily life from baseline to lockdown. While total HADS-depression scores increased significantly at follow-up, this did not translate into more participants scoring above the HADS threshold for clinically significant depression. No significant relationships were noted between disease duration, processing speed ability or EDSS, and changes in symptoms of depression or anxiety. Most participants reported the impact of the virus on their psychological well-being, with a little impact on financial well-being. The perceived impact of the pandemic on physical and psychological well-being was correlated with the impact of MS symptomatology on daily life, as well as changes in depression.

CONCLUSIONS: Overall, little change was noted in symptoms of depression or anxiety or overall quality of life.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
BogserieJournal of Neurology
Vol/bind268
Sider (fra-til)1598–1607
ISSN0939-1517
DOI
StatusUdgivet - maj 2021

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