The Association Between Smoking on Olfactory Dysfunction in 3,900 Patients With Olfactory Loss

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The Association Between Smoking on Olfactory Dysfunction in 3,900 Patients With Olfactory Loss. / Fjaeldstad, Alexander W; Ovesen, Therese; Hummel, Thomas.

I: The Laryngoscope, Bind 131, Nr. 1, 01.2021, s. E8-E13.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{551e6fcd19eb4aa5be2f94a901761e17,
title = "The Association Between Smoking on Olfactory Dysfunction in 3,900 Patients With Olfactory Loss",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The association between smoking and olfactory loss remains a conundrum. Prior studies have found negative and positive effects of smoking on olfactory function in the general population. However, smoking cessation seems to improve both rated and measured olfactory function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the olfactory function and smoking habits in patients with olfactory loss caused by different etiologies to unveil underlying patterns related to smoking.STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective observational study.METHODS: Patients were included from two specialized taste and smell centers. Patients underwent olfactory testing, clinical examination including rhinoscopy, and the underlying etiology was identified. Patterns of olfactory test scores, demographics, and etiologies were analyzed.RESULTS: In total, 3,900 patients with olfactory loss were included. Of these, 521 were current smokers, and 316 were former smokers. Patients with a history of smoking did not have significantly lower olfactory function. Current smokers were more often affected by posttraumatic olfactory loss, but not sinonasal, postviral, or idiopathic olfactory loss.CONCLUSIONS: Current smoking, but not former smoking, was associated with posttraumatic olfactory loss. In relation to measured olfactory function, a history of smoking was not associated to lower olfactory scores. Our findings suggest that the general recommendations of smoking cessation for patients with olfactory loss are especially relevant for patients with posttraumatic olfactory loss. The nature of this association between current smoking and posttraumatic olfactory loss has yet to be elucidated.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2b Laryngoscope, 2020.",
keywords = "Lugtesans, rygning, Flavour",
author = "Fjaeldstad, {Alexander W} and Therese Ovesen and Thomas Hummel",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1002/lary.28552",
language = "English",
volume = "131",
pages = "E8--E13",
journal = "Laryngoscope",
issn = "0023-852X",
publisher = "JohnWiley & Sons, Inc.",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Association Between Smoking on Olfactory Dysfunction in 3,900 Patients With Olfactory Loss

AU - Fjaeldstad, Alexander W

AU - Ovesen, Therese

AU - Hummel, Thomas

N1 - © 2020 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

PY - 2021/1

Y1 - 2021/1

N2 - OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The association between smoking and olfactory loss remains a conundrum. Prior studies have found negative and positive effects of smoking on olfactory function in the general population. However, smoking cessation seems to improve both rated and measured olfactory function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the olfactory function and smoking habits in patients with olfactory loss caused by different etiologies to unveil underlying patterns related to smoking.STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective observational study.METHODS: Patients were included from two specialized taste and smell centers. Patients underwent olfactory testing, clinical examination including rhinoscopy, and the underlying etiology was identified. Patterns of olfactory test scores, demographics, and etiologies were analyzed.RESULTS: In total, 3,900 patients with olfactory loss were included. Of these, 521 were current smokers, and 316 were former smokers. Patients with a history of smoking did not have significantly lower olfactory function. Current smokers were more often affected by posttraumatic olfactory loss, but not sinonasal, postviral, or idiopathic olfactory loss.CONCLUSIONS: Current smoking, but not former smoking, was associated with posttraumatic olfactory loss. In relation to measured olfactory function, a history of smoking was not associated to lower olfactory scores. Our findings suggest that the general recommendations of smoking cessation for patients with olfactory loss are especially relevant for patients with posttraumatic olfactory loss. The nature of this association between current smoking and posttraumatic olfactory loss has yet to be elucidated.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2b Laryngoscope, 2020.

AB - OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: The association between smoking and olfactory loss remains a conundrum. Prior studies have found negative and positive effects of smoking on olfactory function in the general population. However, smoking cessation seems to improve both rated and measured olfactory function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the olfactory function and smoking habits in patients with olfactory loss caused by different etiologies to unveil underlying patterns related to smoking.STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective observational study.METHODS: Patients were included from two specialized taste and smell centers. Patients underwent olfactory testing, clinical examination including rhinoscopy, and the underlying etiology was identified. Patterns of olfactory test scores, demographics, and etiologies were analyzed.RESULTS: In total, 3,900 patients with olfactory loss were included. Of these, 521 were current smokers, and 316 were former smokers. Patients with a history of smoking did not have significantly lower olfactory function. Current smokers were more often affected by posttraumatic olfactory loss, but not sinonasal, postviral, or idiopathic olfactory loss.CONCLUSIONS: Current smoking, but not former smoking, was associated with posttraumatic olfactory loss. In relation to measured olfactory function, a history of smoking was not associated to lower olfactory scores. Our findings suggest that the general recommendations of smoking cessation for patients with olfactory loss are especially relevant for patients with posttraumatic olfactory loss. The nature of this association between current smoking and posttraumatic olfactory loss has yet to be elucidated.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2b Laryngoscope, 2020.

KW - Lugtesans

KW - rygning

KW - Flavour

U2 - 10.1002/lary.28552

DO - 10.1002/lary.28552

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32096874

VL - 131

SP - E8-E13

JO - Laryngoscope

JF - Laryngoscope

SN - 0023-852X

IS - 1

ER -