The Association Between Changes in Weekly Running Distance and Running-Related Injury: Preparing for a Half Marathon

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The Association Between Changes in Weekly Running Distance and Running-Related Injury : Preparing for a Half Marathon. / Damsted, Camma; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Sørensen, Henrik; Malisoux, Laurent; Hulme, Adam; Oestergaard Nielsen, Rasmus.

I: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Bind 49, Nr. 4, 2019, s. 230-238.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Damsted, Camma ; Parner, Erik Thorlund ; Sørensen, Henrik ; Malisoux, Laurent ; Hulme, Adam ; Oestergaard Nielsen, Rasmus. / The Association Between Changes in Weekly Running Distance and Running-Related Injury : Preparing for a Half Marathon. I: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy. 2019 ; Bind 49, Nr. 4. s. 230-238.

Bibtex

@article{d7347887c1ce4a91a45af8bde1a722d4,
title = "The Association Between Changes in Weekly Running Distance and Running-Related Injury: Preparing for a Half Marathon",
abstract = "STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study with a study period of 14-weeks.BACKGROUND: Sudden changes in training load have been suggested to play a key role in the development of running-related injury (RRI). Since the injury mechanism also depends on the runner's musculoskeletal load capacity, the running schedule undertaken prior to the sudden change may influence the amount of change a runner is able to tolerate before placing the runner at a high risk of RRI.OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between changes in weekly running distances and RRI, and to examine whether this association is modified by the type of running schedule followed.METHODS: A cohort of 261 healthy non-injured runners was included. Data on running activity were collected objectively on a daily basis using a Global-Positioning System watch or smartphone. RRIs were collected using e-mail-based weekly questionnaires. Primary exposure was changes in weekly running distances. Data were analyzed with time-to-event models producing cumulative risk difference (RD) as the measure of association.RESULTS: A total of 56 participants (21.5%) sustained an RRI during the 14-week study period Twenty-one days into the study period significantly more runners were injured when increasing their weekly running distance between 20%-60% compared with increasing ≤20% (RD21 days = 22.6% (95% CI: 0.9%, 44.3%); p=0.041). No significant difference was found after 56 and 98 days. No significant effect-measure modification by running schedule was found.CONCLUSION: Significantly more runners were injured 21 days into the study period when increasing their weekly running distance between 20%-60% compared with those increasing less than 20%.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognosis, level 1b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 7 Dec 2018. doi:10.2519/jospt.2019.8541.",
keywords = "ALL-CAUSE, CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY, ETIOLOGY, MECHANISMS, PARTICIPATION, RISK, RUNNERS, SPORT, STATEMENT, WORKLOAD, etiology, prospective cohort, sports, time-to-event analyses",
author = "Camma Damsted and Parner, {Erik Thorlund} and Henrik S{\o}rensen and Laurent Malisoux and Adam Hulme and {Oestergaard Nielsen}, Rasmus",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.2519/jospt.2019.8541",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "230--238",
journal = "Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy",
issn = "0190-6011",
publisher = "American Physical Therapy Association Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy Sections",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Association Between Changes in Weekly Running Distance and Running-Related Injury

T2 - Preparing for a Half Marathon

AU - Damsted, Camma

AU - Parner, Erik Thorlund

AU - Sørensen, Henrik

AU - Malisoux, Laurent

AU - Hulme, Adam

AU - Oestergaard Nielsen, Rasmus

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study with a study period of 14-weeks.BACKGROUND: Sudden changes in training load have been suggested to play a key role in the development of running-related injury (RRI). Since the injury mechanism also depends on the runner's musculoskeletal load capacity, the running schedule undertaken prior to the sudden change may influence the amount of change a runner is able to tolerate before placing the runner at a high risk of RRI.OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between changes in weekly running distances and RRI, and to examine whether this association is modified by the type of running schedule followed.METHODS: A cohort of 261 healthy non-injured runners was included. Data on running activity were collected objectively on a daily basis using a Global-Positioning System watch or smartphone. RRIs were collected using e-mail-based weekly questionnaires. Primary exposure was changes in weekly running distances. Data were analyzed with time-to-event models producing cumulative risk difference (RD) as the measure of association.RESULTS: A total of 56 participants (21.5%) sustained an RRI during the 14-week study period Twenty-one days into the study period significantly more runners were injured when increasing their weekly running distance between 20%-60% compared with increasing ≤20% (RD21 days = 22.6% (95% CI: 0.9%, 44.3%); p=0.041). No significant difference was found after 56 and 98 days. No significant effect-measure modification by running schedule was found.CONCLUSION: Significantly more runners were injured 21 days into the study period when increasing their weekly running distance between 20%-60% compared with those increasing less than 20%.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognosis, level 1b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 7 Dec 2018. doi:10.2519/jospt.2019.8541.

AB - STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study with a study period of 14-weeks.BACKGROUND: Sudden changes in training load have been suggested to play a key role in the development of running-related injury (RRI). Since the injury mechanism also depends on the runner's musculoskeletal load capacity, the running schedule undertaken prior to the sudden change may influence the amount of change a runner is able to tolerate before placing the runner at a high risk of RRI.OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between changes in weekly running distances and RRI, and to examine whether this association is modified by the type of running schedule followed.METHODS: A cohort of 261 healthy non-injured runners was included. Data on running activity were collected objectively on a daily basis using a Global-Positioning System watch or smartphone. RRIs were collected using e-mail-based weekly questionnaires. Primary exposure was changes in weekly running distances. Data were analyzed with time-to-event models producing cumulative risk difference (RD) as the measure of association.RESULTS: A total of 56 participants (21.5%) sustained an RRI during the 14-week study period Twenty-one days into the study period significantly more runners were injured when increasing their weekly running distance between 20%-60% compared with increasing ≤20% (RD21 days = 22.6% (95% CI: 0.9%, 44.3%); p=0.041). No significant difference was found after 56 and 98 days. No significant effect-measure modification by running schedule was found.CONCLUSION: Significantly more runners were injured 21 days into the study period when increasing their weekly running distance between 20%-60% compared with those increasing less than 20%.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognosis, level 1b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 7 Dec 2018. doi:10.2519/jospt.2019.8541.

KW - ALL-CAUSE

KW - CARDIOVASCULAR MORTALITY

KW - ETIOLOGY

KW - MECHANISMS

KW - PARTICIPATION

KW - RISK

KW - RUNNERS

KW - SPORT

KW - STATEMENT

KW - WORKLOAD

KW - etiology

KW - prospective cohort

KW - sports

KW - time-to-event analyses

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064002606&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2519/jospt.2019.8541

DO - 10.2519/jospt.2019.8541

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30526231

VL - 49

SP - 230

EP - 238

JO - Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy

JF - Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy

SN - 0190-6011

IS - 4

ER -