Technical, Non-Technical, or Both? A Scoping Review of Skills in Simulation-Based Surgical Training

Amalie Asmind Rosendal*, Sigurd Beier Sloth, Jan Duedal Rölfing, Magnus Bie, Rune Dall Jensen

*Corresponding author af dette arbejde

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Technical and non-technical skills are traditionally investigated separately in simulation-based surgical training (SBST). Recent literature has indicated an interrelation of these skills, but a clear relationship is yet to be established. This scoping review aimed to identify published literature on the use of both technical and non-technical learning objectives in SBST and investigate how the entities are related. Additionally, this scoping study reviewed the literature with the aim of mapping how publications on technical and non-technical skills within SBST have changed over time. DESIGN: We conducted a scoping review using the 5 step framework by Arksey and O'Malley and reported our results according to the PRISMA guidelines for scoping reviews. Four databases, PubMed, Web of Science, Embase and Cochrane Library, were systematically searched for empirical studies on SBST. Studies within surgical training addressing both technical and non-technical learning objectives and presenting primary data were included for further analysis. RESULTS: Our scoping review identified 3144 articles on SBST published between 1981 and 2021. During our analysis, an emphasis on technical skills training in published literature was identified. However, recent years have seen an immense increase of publications within either technical or non-technical skills. A similar trend is seen in publications addressing both technical and non-technical. In total, 106 publications addressed both technical and non-technical learning objectives and were included for further analysis. Only 45 of the included articles addressed the relationship between technical and non-technical skills. These articles mainly focused on the effect of non-technical skills on technical skills. CONCLUSIONS: Though literature on the relationship between technical and non-technical skills remains scarce, the included studies on technical skills and non-technical skills such as mental training suggest such a relationship exists. This implies that the separation of the skill sets is not necessarily beneficial for the outcome of SBST. A shift towards seeing technical and non-technical skills as intertwined may enhance learning outcomes from SBST.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftJournal of Surgical Education
Vol/bind80
Nummer5
Sider (fra-til)731-749
ISSN1931-7204
DOI
StatusUdgivet - maj 2023

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