Socio-economic consequences of Cushing’s syndrome: a nationwide cohort study

Publikation: Bog/antologi/afhandling/rapportRapportForskning

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Socio-economic consequences of Cushing’s syndrome: a nationwide cohort study. / Ebbehoj, A.

Aarhus, 2020. 21 s.

Publikation: Bog/antologi/afhandling/rapportRapportForskning

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@book{bd6c9d695821488fa04642312d994a54,
title = "Socio-economic consequences of Cushing{\textquoteright}s syndrome: a nationwide cohort study",
abstract = "Cushing{\textquoteright}s syndrome (CS) is an endocrine disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to high levels of glucocorticoids. Data on the socio-economic consequences of CS are sparse. We therefore conducted a nationwide cohort study to determine the socio-economic consequences of endogenous CS.Using the Danish health registries, we identified 411 patients operated for pituitary (pitCS) or adrenal CS (adrCS) 1986-2017. Each patient was matched with 10 healthy persons (reference population). We obtained registry data on socio-economic factors and followed them from up to ten years before diagnosis to ten years after surgery.We found, that fewer patients were in a fulltime job from 6 years before diagnosis [-9% (CI95: 3-16)] and up to 10 years after surgery [-24% (CI95: 16-31)], and income was decreased by 47000 DKK (CI95 25500-68400), when compared to the reference population. Female sex, age, low education, and comorbidity predicted low likelihood of returning to work. CS did not affect education, marital status, and parenthood.In conclusion, we found that CS negatively affects work life and income both before diagnosis and after treatment.",
keywords = "Cushing's syndrome, epidemiology, socio-economic analysis, income, employment, sick leave",
author = "A Ebbehoj",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
language = "English",

}

RIS

TY - RPRT

T1 - Socio-economic consequences of Cushing’s syndrome: a nationwide cohort study

AU - Ebbehoj, A

PY - 2020/1

Y1 - 2020/1

N2 - Cushing’s syndrome (CS) is an endocrine disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to high levels of glucocorticoids. Data on the socio-economic consequences of CS are sparse. We therefore conducted a nationwide cohort study to determine the socio-economic consequences of endogenous CS.Using the Danish health registries, we identified 411 patients operated for pituitary (pitCS) or adrenal CS (adrCS) 1986-2017. Each patient was matched with 10 healthy persons (reference population). We obtained registry data on socio-economic factors and followed them from up to ten years before diagnosis to ten years after surgery.We found, that fewer patients were in a fulltime job from 6 years before diagnosis [-9% (CI95: 3-16)] and up to 10 years after surgery [-24% (CI95: 16-31)], and income was decreased by 47000 DKK (CI95 25500-68400), when compared to the reference population. Female sex, age, low education, and comorbidity predicted low likelihood of returning to work. CS did not affect education, marital status, and parenthood.In conclusion, we found that CS negatively affects work life and income both before diagnosis and after treatment.

AB - Cushing’s syndrome (CS) is an endocrine disorder resulting from prolonged exposure to high levels of glucocorticoids. Data on the socio-economic consequences of CS are sparse. We therefore conducted a nationwide cohort study to determine the socio-economic consequences of endogenous CS.Using the Danish health registries, we identified 411 patients operated for pituitary (pitCS) or adrenal CS (adrCS) 1986-2017. Each patient was matched with 10 healthy persons (reference population). We obtained registry data on socio-economic factors and followed them from up to ten years before diagnosis to ten years after surgery.We found, that fewer patients were in a fulltime job from 6 years before diagnosis [-9% (CI95: 3-16)] and up to 10 years after surgery [-24% (CI95: 16-31)], and income was decreased by 47000 DKK (CI95 25500-68400), when compared to the reference population. Female sex, age, low education, and comorbidity predicted low likelihood of returning to work. CS did not affect education, marital status, and parenthood.In conclusion, we found that CS negatively affects work life and income both before diagnosis and after treatment.

KW - Cushing's syndrome

KW - epidemiology

KW - socio-economic analysis

KW - income

KW - employment

KW - sick leave

M3 - Report

BT - Socio-economic consequences of Cushing’s syndrome: a nationwide cohort study

CY - Aarhus

ER -