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Short-term high temperature treatment reduces viability and inhibits respiration and DNA repair enzymes in Araucaria angustifolia cells

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  • Ana L.D.M. Furlanetto, Universidade Federal do Paraná, Univ of Arhus
  • ,
  • Silvia M.S.C. Cadena, Universidade Federal do Paraná
  • ,
  • Glaucia R. Martinez, Universidade Federal do Paraná
  • ,
  • Beatriz Ferrando, Univ of Arhus
  • ,
  • Tinna Stevnsner
  • Ian M. Møller

We evaluated the effect of global warming on Araucaria angustifolia (Bert.) O. Kuntze, a critically endangered native tree of Southern Brazil, by studying the effects of short-term high temperature treatment on cell viability, respiration and DNA repair of embryogenic cells. Compared with control cells grown at 25°C, cell viability was reduced by 40% after incubation at 30 and 37°C for 24 and 6 h, respectively, while 2 h at 40 and 42°C killed 95% of the cells. Cell respiration was unaffected at 30-37°C, but dramatically reduced after 2 h at 42°C. The in vitro activity of enzymes of the base excision repair (BER) pathway was determined. Apurinic/apyrimidine endonuclease, measured in extracts from cells incubated for 2 h at 42°C, was completely inactivated while lower temperatures had no effect. The activities of three enzymes of the mitochondrial BER pathway were measured after 30-min preincubation of isolated mitochondria at 25-40°C and one of them, uracil glycosylase, was completely inhibited at 40°C. We conclude that cell viability, respiration and DNA repair have different temperature sensitivities between 25 and 37°C, and that they are all very sensitive to 40 or 42°C. Thus, A. angustifolia will likely be vulnerable to the short-term high temperature events associated with global warming.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPhysiologia Plantarum
ISSN0031-9317
DOI
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 27 jun. 2018

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