Short-term breast cancer survival in relation to ethnicity, stage, grade and receptor status: National cohort study in England

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DOI

  • Henrik Møller
  • Katherine Henson, National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service, Public Health England, Skipton House, 80 London Road, London SE1 6LH, UK.
  • ,
  • Margreet Lüchtenborg, Cancer Epidemiology, Population and Global Health, King's College London, Bermondsey Wing, 3rd Floor, Guy's Hospital, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9RT, UK.
  • ,
  • John Broggio, National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service, Public Health England, Skipton House, 80 London Road, London SE1 6LH, UK.
  • ,
  • Jackie Charman, National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service, Public Health England, Skipton House, 80 London Road, London SE1 6LH, UK.
  • ,
  • Victoria H Coupland, National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service, Public Health England, Skipton House, 80 London Road, London SE1 6LH, UK.
  • ,
  • Elizabeth Davies, Cancer Epidemiology, Population and Global Health, King's College London, Bermondsey Wing, 3rd Floor, Guy's Hospital, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9RT, UK.
  • ,
  • Ruth H Jack, National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service, Public Health England, Skipton House, 80 London Road, London SE1 6LH, UK.
  • ,
  • Richard Sullivan, Cancer Epidemiology, Population and Global Health, King's College London, Bermondsey Wing, 3rd Floor, Guy's Hospital, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9RT, UK.
  • ,
  • Peter Vedsted
  • Kieran Horgan, School of Medicine, University of Leeds, Leeds, West Yorkshire, LS9 7TF, UK.
  • ,
  • Neil Pearce, Departments of Medical Statistics and Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK.
  • ,
  • Arnie Purushotham, Cancer Epidemiology, Population and Global Health, King's College London, Bermondsey Wing, 3rd Floor, Guy's Hospital, Great Maze Pond, London SE1 9RT, UK.

BACKGROUND: In the re-organisation of cancer registration in England in 2012, a high priority was given to the recording of cancer stage and other prognostic clinical data items.

METHODS: We extracted 86 852 breast cancer records for women resident in England and diagnosed during 2012-2013. Information on age, ethnicity, socio-economic status, comorbidity, tumour stage, grade, morphology and oestrogen, progesterone and HER2 receptor status was included. The two-year cumulative risk of death from any cause was estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method, and univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The follow-up ended on 31 December 2014.

RESULTS: The completeness of registration for prognostic variables was generally high (around 80% or higher), but it was low for progesterone receptor status (41%). Women with negative receptor status for each of the oestrogen, progesterone and HER2 receptors (triple-negative cancers) had an adjusted HR for death of 2.00 (95%CI 1.84-2.17). Black women had an age-adjusted HR of 1.77 (1.48-2.13) compared with White women.

CONCLUSIONS: The excess mortality of Black women with breast cancer has contributions from socio-economic factors, stage distribution and tumour biology. The study illustrates the richness of detail in the national cancer registration data. This allows for analysis of cancer outcomes at a high level of resolution, and may form the basis for risk stratification.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 25 October 2016; doi:10.1038/bjc.2016.335 www.bjcancer.com.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftB J C
ISSN0007-0920
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 25 okt. 2016

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