Sensory and motor axonal excitability testing in early diabetic neuropathy

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Sensory and motor axonal excitability testing in early diabetic neuropathy. / Kristensen, A. G.; Gylfadottir, S.; Itani, M.; Kuwabara, S.; Krøigård, T.; Khan, K. S.; Finnerup, N. B.; Andersen, H.; Jensen, T. S.; Sindrup, S.; Tankisi, H.

I: Clinical Neurophysiology, Bind 132, Nr. 7, 07.2021, s. 1407-1415.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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Kristensen, A. G. ; Gylfadottir, S. ; Itani, M. ; Kuwabara, S. ; Krøigård, T. ; Khan, K. S. ; Finnerup, N. B. ; Andersen, H. ; Jensen, T. S. ; Sindrup, S. ; Tankisi, H. / Sensory and motor axonal excitability testing in early diabetic neuropathy. I: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2021 ; Bind 132, Nr. 7. s. 1407-1415.

Bibtex

@article{9eced53c495d47c9ac8ec1dbc0eebdf4,
title = "Sensory and motor axonal excitability testing in early diabetic neuropathy",
abstract = "Objective: The aim of the present study was to gain insight into the pathophysiology of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) and examine the diagnostic value of sensory and motor axonal excitability testing. Methods: One hundred and eleven type 2 diabetics with and without DPN (disease duration: 6.36 ± 0.25 years) and 60 controls were included. All participants received a thorough clinical examination including Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) score, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and sensory and motor excitability tests. Patients were compared by the likelihood of neuropathy presence, ranging from no DPN (17), possible/probable DPN (46) to NCS-confirmed DPN (48). Results: Motor excitability tests showed differences in rheobase and depolarizing threshold electrotonus measures between NCS-confirmed DPN group and controls but no changes in hyperpolarising threshold electrotonus or recovery cycle parameters. Sensory excitability showed even less changes despite pronounced sensory NCS abnormalities. There were only weak correlations between the above motor excitability parameters and clinical scores. Conclusions: Changes in excitability in the examined patient group were subtle, perhaps because of the relatively short disease duration. Significance: Less pronounced excitability changes than NCS suggest that axonal excitability testing is not of diagnostic value for early DPN and does not provide information on the mechanisms.",
keywords = "Axonal excitability testing, Diabetic polyneuropathy, Nerve conduction studies, Type-2 diabetes",
author = "Kristensen, {A. G.} and S. Gylfadottir and M. Itani and S. Kuwabara and T. Kr{\o}ig{\aa}rd and Khan, {K. S.} and Finnerup, {N. B.} and H. Andersen and Jensen, {T. S.} and S. Sindrup and H. Tankisi",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology",
year = "2021",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1016/j.clinph.2021.02.397",
language = "English",
volume = "132",
pages = "1407--1415",
journal = "Clinical Neurophysiology",
issn = "1388-2457",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd.",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sensory and motor axonal excitability testing in early diabetic neuropathy

AU - Kristensen, A. G.

AU - Gylfadottir, S.

AU - Itani, M.

AU - Kuwabara, S.

AU - Krøigård, T.

AU - Khan, K. S.

AU - Finnerup, N. B.

AU - Andersen, H.

AU - Jensen, T. S.

AU - Sindrup, S.

AU - Tankisi, H.

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2021 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology

PY - 2021/7

Y1 - 2021/7

N2 - Objective: The aim of the present study was to gain insight into the pathophysiology of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) and examine the diagnostic value of sensory and motor axonal excitability testing. Methods: One hundred and eleven type 2 diabetics with and without DPN (disease duration: 6.36 ± 0.25 years) and 60 controls were included. All participants received a thorough clinical examination including Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) score, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and sensory and motor excitability tests. Patients were compared by the likelihood of neuropathy presence, ranging from no DPN (17), possible/probable DPN (46) to NCS-confirmed DPN (48). Results: Motor excitability tests showed differences in rheobase and depolarizing threshold electrotonus measures between NCS-confirmed DPN group and controls but no changes in hyperpolarising threshold electrotonus or recovery cycle parameters. Sensory excitability showed even less changes despite pronounced sensory NCS abnormalities. There were only weak correlations between the above motor excitability parameters and clinical scores. Conclusions: Changes in excitability in the examined patient group were subtle, perhaps because of the relatively short disease duration. Significance: Less pronounced excitability changes than NCS suggest that axonal excitability testing is not of diagnostic value for early DPN and does not provide information on the mechanisms.

AB - Objective: The aim of the present study was to gain insight into the pathophysiology of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) and examine the diagnostic value of sensory and motor axonal excitability testing. Methods: One hundred and eleven type 2 diabetics with and without DPN (disease duration: 6.36 ± 0.25 years) and 60 controls were included. All participants received a thorough clinical examination including Michigan Neuropathy Screening Instrument (MNSI) score, nerve conduction studies (NCS), and sensory and motor excitability tests. Patients were compared by the likelihood of neuropathy presence, ranging from no DPN (17), possible/probable DPN (46) to NCS-confirmed DPN (48). Results: Motor excitability tests showed differences in rheobase and depolarizing threshold electrotonus measures between NCS-confirmed DPN group and controls but no changes in hyperpolarising threshold electrotonus or recovery cycle parameters. Sensory excitability showed even less changes despite pronounced sensory NCS abnormalities. There were only weak correlations between the above motor excitability parameters and clinical scores. Conclusions: Changes in excitability in the examined patient group were subtle, perhaps because of the relatively short disease duration. Significance: Less pronounced excitability changes than NCS suggest that axonal excitability testing is not of diagnostic value for early DPN and does not provide information on the mechanisms.

KW - Axonal excitability testing

KW - Diabetic polyneuropathy

KW - Nerve conduction studies

KW - Type-2 diabetes

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85106393588&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.clinph.2021.02.397

DO - 10.1016/j.clinph.2021.02.397

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34030050

AN - SCOPUS:85106393588

VL - 132

SP - 1407

EP - 1415

JO - Clinical Neurophysiology

JF - Clinical Neurophysiology

SN - 1388-2457

IS - 7

ER -