Institut for Statskundskab

Self-Affirmation and Identity-Driven Political Behavior

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Standard

Self-Affirmation and Identity-Driven Political Behavior. / Lyons, Benjamin A.; Farhart, Christina E.; Hall, Michael P. et al.

I: Journal of Experimental Political Science, Bind 9, Nr. 2, 2022, s. 225-240.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Lyons, BA, Farhart, CE, Hall, MP, Kotcher, J, Levendusky, M, Miller, JM, Nyhan, B, Raimi, KT, Reifler, J, Saunders, KL, Skytte, R & Zhao, X 2022, 'Self-Affirmation and Identity-Driven Political Behavior', Journal of Experimental Political Science, bind 9, nr. 2, s. 225-240. https://doi.org/10.1017/XPS.2020.46

APA

Lyons, B. A., Farhart, C. E., Hall, M. P., Kotcher, J., Levendusky, M., Miller, J. M., Nyhan, B., Raimi, K. T., Reifler, J., Saunders, K. L., Skytte, R., & Zhao, X. (2022). Self-Affirmation and Identity-Driven Political Behavior. Journal of Experimental Political Science, 9(2), 225-240. https://doi.org/10.1017/XPS.2020.46

CBE

Lyons BA, Farhart CE, Hall MP, Kotcher J, Levendusky M, Miller JM, Nyhan B, Raimi KT, Reifler J, Saunders KL, et al. 2022. Self-Affirmation and Identity-Driven Political Behavior. Journal of Experimental Political Science. 9(2):225-240. https://doi.org/10.1017/XPS.2020.46

MLA

Lyons, Benjamin A. et al. "Self-Affirmation and Identity-Driven Political Behavior". Journal of Experimental Political Science. 2022, 9(2). 225-240. https://doi.org/10.1017/XPS.2020.46

Vancouver

Lyons BA, Farhart CE, Hall MP, Kotcher J, Levendusky M, Miller JM et al. Self-Affirmation and Identity-Driven Political Behavior. Journal of Experimental Political Science. 2022;9(2):225-240. https://doi.org/10.1017/XPS.2020.46

Author

Lyons, Benjamin A. ; Farhart, Christina E. ; Hall, Michael P. et al. / Self-Affirmation and Identity-Driven Political Behavior. I: Journal of Experimental Political Science. 2022 ; Bind 9, Nr. 2. s. 225-240.

Bibtex

@article{7aa4bfce0067486b89014ffaa03e8d8e,
title = "Self-Affirmation and Identity-Driven Political Behavior",
abstract = "Psychological attachment to political parties can bias people's attitudes, beliefs, and group evaluations. Studies from psychology suggest that self-affirmation theory may ameliorate this problem in the domain of politics on a variety of outcome measures. We report a series of studies conducted by separate research teams that examine whether a self-affirmation intervention affects a variety of outcomes, including political or policy attitudes, factual beliefs, conspiracy beliefs, affective polarization, and evaluations of news sources. The different research teams use a variety of self-affirmation interventions, research designs, and outcomes. Despite these differences, the research teams consistently find that self-affirmation treatments have little effect. These findings suggest considerable caution is warranted for researchers who wish to apply the self-affirmation framework to studies that investigate political attitudes and beliefs. By presenting the {"}null results{"} of separate research teams, we hope to spark a discussion about whether and how the self-affirmation paradigm should be applied to political topics.",
keywords = "Self-affirmation, polarization, partisanship, political behavior, CLIMATE-CHANGE, INFORMATION, BELIEFS, ACCEPTANCE, PSYCHOLOGY, SUPPORT, ORIGINS",
author = "Lyons, {Benjamin A.} and Farhart, {Christina E.} and Hall, {Michael P.} and John Kotcher and Matthew Levendusky and Miller, {Joanne M.} and Brendan Nyhan and Raimi, {Kaitlin T.} and Jason Reifler and Saunders, {Kyle L.} and Rasmus Skytte and Xiaoquan Zhao",
year = "2022",
doi = "10.1017/XPS.2020.46",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "225--240",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Political Science",
issn = "2052-2630",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-Affirmation and Identity-Driven Political Behavior

AU - Lyons, Benjamin A.

AU - Farhart, Christina E.

AU - Hall, Michael P.

AU - Kotcher, John

AU - Levendusky, Matthew

AU - Miller, Joanne M.

AU - Nyhan, Brendan

AU - Raimi, Kaitlin T.

AU - Reifler, Jason

AU - Saunders, Kyle L.

AU - Skytte, Rasmus

AU - Zhao, Xiaoquan

PY - 2022

Y1 - 2022

N2 - Psychological attachment to political parties can bias people's attitudes, beliefs, and group evaluations. Studies from psychology suggest that self-affirmation theory may ameliorate this problem in the domain of politics on a variety of outcome measures. We report a series of studies conducted by separate research teams that examine whether a self-affirmation intervention affects a variety of outcomes, including political or policy attitudes, factual beliefs, conspiracy beliefs, affective polarization, and evaluations of news sources. The different research teams use a variety of self-affirmation interventions, research designs, and outcomes. Despite these differences, the research teams consistently find that self-affirmation treatments have little effect. These findings suggest considerable caution is warranted for researchers who wish to apply the self-affirmation framework to studies that investigate political attitudes and beliefs. By presenting the "null results" of separate research teams, we hope to spark a discussion about whether and how the self-affirmation paradigm should be applied to political topics.

AB - Psychological attachment to political parties can bias people's attitudes, beliefs, and group evaluations. Studies from psychology suggest that self-affirmation theory may ameliorate this problem in the domain of politics on a variety of outcome measures. We report a series of studies conducted by separate research teams that examine whether a self-affirmation intervention affects a variety of outcomes, including political or policy attitudes, factual beliefs, conspiracy beliefs, affective polarization, and evaluations of news sources. The different research teams use a variety of self-affirmation interventions, research designs, and outcomes. Despite these differences, the research teams consistently find that self-affirmation treatments have little effect. These findings suggest considerable caution is warranted for researchers who wish to apply the self-affirmation framework to studies that investigate political attitudes and beliefs. By presenting the "null results" of separate research teams, we hope to spark a discussion about whether and how the self-affirmation paradigm should be applied to political topics.

KW - Self-affirmation

KW - polarization

KW - partisanship

KW - political behavior

KW - CLIMATE-CHANGE

KW - INFORMATION

KW - BELIEFS

KW - ACCEPTANCE

KW - PSYCHOLOGY

KW - SUPPORT

KW - ORIGINS

U2 - 10.1017/XPS.2020.46

DO - 10.1017/XPS.2020.46

M3 - Journal article

VL - 9

SP - 225

EP - 240

JO - Journal of Experimental Political Science

JF - Journal of Experimental Political Science

SN - 2052-2630

IS - 2

ER -