Screening for retinopathy in children with type 1 diabetes in Denmark

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DOI

  • Camilla Winther Herskin, Department of Paediatrics, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Birthe Susanne Olsen, Department of Paediatrics, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Mette Madsen, Department of Paediatrics, Aalborg University Hospital, Reberbansgade, DK 9000 Aalborg, Denmark
  • ,
  • Per Kjaersgaard
  • Siri Fredheim, Department of Paediatrics, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Anders Johansen, Rigshospitalet
  • ,
  • Kurt Kristensen
  • Niels Holtum Birkebaek
  • Jannet Svensson, Department of Paediatrics, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
  • ,
  • Kasper Ascanius Pilgaard, Pediatric and Adolescent Department, Nordsjaellands Hospital.
  • ,
  • Jesper Johannesen, Department of Paediatrics, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.

Background/Objective: Children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are screened regularly for retinopathy with fundus photography to prevent visual impairment. According to Danish national guidelines, screening should take place at age 12, 15, and 18 years after minimum 3 years of diabetes. As glycemic control has improved, prevalence of retinopathy is expected to be decreased. The aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence, degree, and progression of retinopathy in children with T1D and to explore if screening at 12 years is currently indicated in Denmark. Methods: Data on all Danish children with onset of T1D from 2003 to 2013 (n = 2943) were collected from the “DanDiabKids” registry. For children with registered screenings (n = 2382), prevalence of retinopathy at 12, 15, and 18 years was determined. In children with retinopathy, subsequent screenings were studied to reveal if retinopathy was persistent or temporary. Results: Prevalence of retinopathy at 12, 15, and 18 years was 0.9%, 2.3%, and 3.1%, respectively. Minimal background retinopathy was seen in over 90% and 100% at 12 years. In available re-screenings, retinopathy resolved spontaneously in 87.5% of all cases and 100% of cases at 12 years. Conclusions: The prevalence of retinopathy in Danish children with T1D was low. At 12 years, prevalence was 0.9% and exclusively minimal background retinopathy with 100% remission in re-screenings. Thus, screening at this age does not seem to have significant clinical relevance. We propose more individualized screening selection before the age of 15.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftPediatric Diabetes
Vol/bind21
Nummer1
Sider (fra-til)106-111
Antal sider6
ISSN1399-543X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2020

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