Institut for Statskundskab

Roadblocks to citizenship: selection effects of restrictive naturalisation rules

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Roadblocks to citizenship : selection effects of restrictive naturalisation rules. / Jensen, Kristian Kriegbaum; Mouritsen, Per; Bech, Emily Cochran et al.

I: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Bind 47, Nr. 5, 2021, s. 1047-1065.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Jensen, KK, Mouritsen, P, Bech, EC & Olsen, TV 2021, 'Roadblocks to citizenship: selection effects of restrictive naturalisation rules', Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, bind 47, nr. 5, s. 1047-1065. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2019.1667757

APA

CBE

MLA

Jensen, Kristian Kriegbaum et al. "Roadblocks to citizenship: selection effects of restrictive naturalisation rules". Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. 2021, 47(5). 1047-1065. https://doi.org/10.1080/1369183X.2019.1667757

Vancouver

Jensen KK, Mouritsen P, Bech EC, Olsen TV. Roadblocks to citizenship: selection effects of restrictive naturalisation rules. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. 2021;47(5):1047-1065. doi: 10.1080/1369183X.2019.1667757

Author

Jensen, Kristian Kriegbaum ; Mouritsen, Per ; Bech, Emily Cochran et al. / Roadblocks to citizenship : selection effects of restrictive naturalisation rules. I: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies. 2021 ; Bind 47, Nr. 5. s. 1047-1065.

Bibtex

@article{fd06715845d7429195a142adf3bf45bb,
title = "Roadblocks to citizenship: selection effects of restrictive naturalisation rules",
abstract = "With rising requirements for citizenship across Western Europe, Denmark is one of the restrictive {\textquoteleft}leaders,{\textquoteright} with tough rules for language ability, economic self-support, and a clean criminal record. But what do these restrictions mean for newcomers{\textquoteright} ability to qualify, and how does this differ between different types of immigrants? Using register data on refugees and family migrants who immigrated to Denmark between 2001 and 2009, we show that tough language requirements exclude more people than self-support and crime rules, and many cannot qualify even after 13 years in the country. Across groups, education level at entry is the biggest predictor of whether and when newcomers qualify. These findings raise questions about the liberal nature of such requirements and about the future of democratic inclusion in Western Europe.",
keywords = "Citizenship, civic integration, exclusion, family migrants, naturalisation, refugees",
author = "Jensen, {Kristian Kriegbaum} and Per Mouritsen and Bech, {Emily Cochran} and Olsen, {Tore Vincents}",
year = "2021",
doi = "10.1080/1369183X.2019.1667757",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "1047--1065",
journal = "Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies",
issn = "1369-183X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Roadblocks to citizenship

T2 - selection effects of restrictive naturalisation rules

AU - Jensen, Kristian Kriegbaum

AU - Mouritsen, Per

AU - Bech, Emily Cochran

AU - Olsen, Tore Vincents

PY - 2021

Y1 - 2021

N2 - With rising requirements for citizenship across Western Europe, Denmark is one of the restrictive ‘leaders,’ with tough rules for language ability, economic self-support, and a clean criminal record. But what do these restrictions mean for newcomers’ ability to qualify, and how does this differ between different types of immigrants? Using register data on refugees and family migrants who immigrated to Denmark between 2001 and 2009, we show that tough language requirements exclude more people than self-support and crime rules, and many cannot qualify even after 13 years in the country. Across groups, education level at entry is the biggest predictor of whether and when newcomers qualify. These findings raise questions about the liberal nature of such requirements and about the future of democratic inclusion in Western Europe.

AB - With rising requirements for citizenship across Western Europe, Denmark is one of the restrictive ‘leaders,’ with tough rules for language ability, economic self-support, and a clean criminal record. But what do these restrictions mean for newcomers’ ability to qualify, and how does this differ between different types of immigrants? Using register data on refugees and family migrants who immigrated to Denmark between 2001 and 2009, we show that tough language requirements exclude more people than self-support and crime rules, and many cannot qualify even after 13 years in the country. Across groups, education level at entry is the biggest predictor of whether and when newcomers qualify. These findings raise questions about the liberal nature of such requirements and about the future of democratic inclusion in Western Europe.

KW - Citizenship

KW - civic integration

KW - exclusion

KW - family migrants

KW - naturalisation

KW - refugees

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85073949884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/1369183X.2019.1667757

DO - 10.1080/1369183X.2019.1667757

M3 - Journal article

AN - SCOPUS:85073949884

VL - 47

SP - 1047

EP - 1065

JO - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

JF - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

SN - 1369-183X

IS - 5

ER -