Road Traffic Noise Exposure and Filled Prescriptions for Antihypertensive Medication: A Danish Cohort Study

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DOI

  • Jesse D Thacher, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark., Danmark
  • Aslak H Poulsen, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark., Danmark
  • Nina Roswall, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark., Danmark
  • Ulla Hvidtfeldt, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark., Danmark
  • Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
  • Steen Solvang Jensen
  • Matthias Ketzel
  • Jørgen Brandt
  • Kim Overvad
  • Anne Tjønneland, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark., Københavns Universitet, Danmark
  • Thomas Münzel, Department of Neurology, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz Germany, Tyskland
  • Mette Sørensen, Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen, Department of Natural Science and Environment

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological research on effects of transportation noise on incident hypertension is inconsistent.

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate whether residential road traffic noise increases the risk for hypertension.

METHODS: In a population-based cohort of 57,053 individuals 50-64 years of age at enrollment, we identified 21,241 individuals who fulfilled our case definition of filling ≥ 2 prescriptions and ≥ 180 defined daily doses of antihypertensive drugs (AHTs) within a year, during a mean follow-up time of 14.0 y. Residential addresses from 1987 to 2016 were obtained from national registers, and road traffic noise at the most exposed façade as well as the least exposed façade was modeled for all addresses. Analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazards models.

RESULTS: We found no associations between the 10-y mean exposure to road traffic noise and filled prescriptions for AHTs, with incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of 0.999 [95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.980, 1.019)] per 10-dB increase in road traffic noise at the most exposed façade and of 1.001 (95% CI: 0.977, 1.026) at the least exposed façade. Interaction analyses suggested an association with road traffic noise at the least exposed façade among subpopulations of current smokers and obese individuals.

CONCLUSION: The present study does not support an association between road traffic noise and filled prescriptions for AHTs. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP6273.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer57004
TidsskriftEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Vol/bind128
Nummer5
Antal sider9
ISSN0091-6765
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 2020

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