Risk stratification in men with a negative prostate biopsy: An interim analysis of a prospective cohort study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Standard

Risk stratification in men with a negative prostate biopsy : An interim analysis of a prospective cohort study. / Sandahl, Mads; Pedersen, Bodil Ginnerup; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm; Borre, Michael; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard.

I: BJU International, 08.05.2021.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{3c74067a28e742948c09335e23eddd80,
title = "Risk stratification in men with a negative prostate biopsy: An interim analysis of a prospective cohort study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate if a risk score for prostate cancer (PC) lifetime risk can be used to optimize triaging of patients with a negative prostate biopsy, but under sustained suspicion of PC.METHODS AND PATIENTS: In this prospective clinical study, we included, and risk scored patients who had a cancer-negative transrectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) prostate biopsy, but elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA), a suspicious prostate digital rectal examination and/or a positive family history (FH) of PC. The risk score estimated individual lifetime risk of PC, based on a polygenic risk score (33 single nucleotide polymorphisms), age, and FH of PC. Patients were followed, under urologic supervision, for up to 4 years with annual controls, always including PSA measurements. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and/or prostate biopsy was performed at selected annual controls depending on risk score and at the urologist's/patient's discretion, which means that the follow-up differed based on the risk score.RESULTS: We included 429 patients. After risk scoring, 376/429 (88%) patients were allocated to a normal-risk group (<30% PC lifetime risk) and 53/429 (12%) to a high-risk group (≥30% PC lifetime risk). The high-risk group had significantly different follow-up, with more biopsy and mpMRI sessions compared to the normal-risk group. PC was detected in 89/429 (21%) patients, with 67/376 (18%) patients diagnosed in the normal-risk group and 22/53 (42%) in the high-risk group. There was no statistically significant difference in the cumulative incidence of PC between the normal-risk group and the high-risk group after 4 years of follow-up. Currently, 67/429 (16%) patients are still being followed in this ongoing study.CONCLUSION: In a 4-year perspective our PC lifetime risk score did not demonstrate significant prognostic value for triaging patients, with a negative TRUS-biopsy and sustained suspicion of PC.",
author = "Mads Sandahl and Pedersen, {Bodil Ginnerup} and Ulh{\o}i, {Benedicte Parm} and Michael Borre and S{\o}rensen, {Karina Dalsgaard}",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = may,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1111/bju.15443",
language = "English",
journal = "B J U International (Online)",
issn = "1464-410X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risk stratification in men with a negative prostate biopsy

T2 - An interim analysis of a prospective cohort study

AU - Sandahl, Mads

AU - Pedersen, Bodil Ginnerup

AU - Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

AU - Borre, Michael

AU - Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/5/8

Y1 - 2021/5/8

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate if a risk score for prostate cancer (PC) lifetime risk can be used to optimize triaging of patients with a negative prostate biopsy, but under sustained suspicion of PC.METHODS AND PATIENTS: In this prospective clinical study, we included, and risk scored patients who had a cancer-negative transrectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) prostate biopsy, but elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA), a suspicious prostate digital rectal examination and/or a positive family history (FH) of PC. The risk score estimated individual lifetime risk of PC, based on a polygenic risk score (33 single nucleotide polymorphisms), age, and FH of PC. Patients were followed, under urologic supervision, for up to 4 years with annual controls, always including PSA measurements. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and/or prostate biopsy was performed at selected annual controls depending on risk score and at the urologist's/patient's discretion, which means that the follow-up differed based on the risk score.RESULTS: We included 429 patients. After risk scoring, 376/429 (88%) patients were allocated to a normal-risk group (<30% PC lifetime risk) and 53/429 (12%) to a high-risk group (≥30% PC lifetime risk). The high-risk group had significantly different follow-up, with more biopsy and mpMRI sessions compared to the normal-risk group. PC was detected in 89/429 (21%) patients, with 67/376 (18%) patients diagnosed in the normal-risk group and 22/53 (42%) in the high-risk group. There was no statistically significant difference in the cumulative incidence of PC between the normal-risk group and the high-risk group after 4 years of follow-up. Currently, 67/429 (16%) patients are still being followed in this ongoing study.CONCLUSION: In a 4-year perspective our PC lifetime risk score did not demonstrate significant prognostic value for triaging patients, with a negative TRUS-biopsy and sustained suspicion of PC.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate if a risk score for prostate cancer (PC) lifetime risk can be used to optimize triaging of patients with a negative prostate biopsy, but under sustained suspicion of PC.METHODS AND PATIENTS: In this prospective clinical study, we included, and risk scored patients who had a cancer-negative transrectal ultrasound guided (TRUS) prostate biopsy, but elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA), a suspicious prostate digital rectal examination and/or a positive family history (FH) of PC. The risk score estimated individual lifetime risk of PC, based on a polygenic risk score (33 single nucleotide polymorphisms), age, and FH of PC. Patients were followed, under urologic supervision, for up to 4 years with annual controls, always including PSA measurements. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and/or prostate biopsy was performed at selected annual controls depending on risk score and at the urologist's/patient's discretion, which means that the follow-up differed based on the risk score.RESULTS: We included 429 patients. After risk scoring, 376/429 (88%) patients were allocated to a normal-risk group (<30% PC lifetime risk) and 53/429 (12%) to a high-risk group (≥30% PC lifetime risk). The high-risk group had significantly different follow-up, with more biopsy and mpMRI sessions compared to the normal-risk group. PC was detected in 89/429 (21%) patients, with 67/376 (18%) patients diagnosed in the normal-risk group and 22/53 (42%) in the high-risk group. There was no statistically significant difference in the cumulative incidence of PC between the normal-risk group and the high-risk group after 4 years of follow-up. Currently, 67/429 (16%) patients are still being followed in this ongoing study.CONCLUSION: In a 4-year perspective our PC lifetime risk score did not demonstrate significant prognostic value for triaging patients, with a negative TRUS-biopsy and sustained suspicion of PC.

U2 - 10.1111/bju.15443

DO - 10.1111/bju.15443

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33964113

JO - B J U International (Online)

JF - B J U International (Online)

SN - 1464-410X

ER -