Resistance training improves muscle strength and functional capacity in multiple sclerosis

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Resistance training improves muscle strength and functional capacity in multiple sclerosis. / Dalgas, U; Stenager, E; Jakobsen, Johannes Klitgaard; Petersen, T; Hansen, Hans Jacob; Knudsen, C; Overgaard, Kristian; Ingemann-Hansen, T.

I: Neurology, Bind 73, Nr. 18, 2009, s. 1478-84.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Dalgas, U, Stenager, E, Jakobsen, JK, Petersen, T, Hansen, HJ, Knudsen, C, Overgaard, K & Ingemann-Hansen, T 2009, 'Resistance training improves muscle strength and functional capacity in multiple sclerosis', Neurology, bind 73, nr. 18, s. 1478-84. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181bf98b4

APA

Dalgas, U., Stenager, E., Jakobsen, J. K., Petersen, T., Hansen, H. J., Knudsen, C., Overgaard, K., & Ingemann-Hansen, T. (2009). Resistance training improves muscle strength and functional capacity in multiple sclerosis. Neurology, 73(18), 1478-84. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181bf98b4

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MLA

Vancouver

Author

Dalgas, U ; Stenager, E ; Jakobsen, Johannes Klitgaard ; Petersen, T ; Hansen, Hans Jacob ; Knudsen, C ; Overgaard, Kristian ; Ingemann-Hansen, T. / Resistance training improves muscle strength and functional capacity in multiple sclerosis. I: Neurology. 2009 ; Bind 73, Nr. 18. s. 1478-84.

Bibtex

@article{f102ae20d8f711de9e3b000ea68e967b,
title = "Resistance training improves muscle strength and functional capacity in multiple sclerosis",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that lower extremity progressive resistance training (PRT) can improve muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to evaluate whether the improvements are maintained after the trial. METHODS: The present study was a 2-arm, 12-week, randomized controlled trial including a poststudy follow-up period of 12 weeks. Thirty-eight moderately impaired patients with MS were randomized to a PRT exercise group (n = 19) or a control group (n = 19). The exercise group completed a biweekly 12-week lower extremity PRT program and was afterward encouraged to continue training. After the trial, the control group completed the PRT intervention. Both groups were tested before and after 12 weeks of the trial and at 24 weeks (follow-up), where isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors (KE MVC) and functional capacity (FS; combined score of 4 tests) were evaluated. RESULTS: KE MVC and FS improved after 12 weeks of PRT in the exercise group (KE MVC: 15.7% [95% confidence interval 4.3-27.0], FS: 21.5% [95% confidence interval 17.0-26.1]; p < 0.05), and the improvements were better than in the control group (p < 0.05). The improvements of KE and FS in the exercise group persisted at follow-up after 24 weeks. Also, the exercise effects were reproduced in the control group during the 12-week posttrial PRT period. CONCLUSIONS: Twelve weeks of intense progressive resistance training of the lower extremities leads to improvements of muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis, the effects persisting after 12 weeks of self-guided physical activity. Level of evidence: The present study provides level III evidence supporting the hypothesis that lower extremity progressive resistance training can improve muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis.",
keywords = "Adult, Aged, Analysis of Variance, Denmark, Female, Hand Strength, Humans, Lower Extremity, Male, Middle Aged, Multiple Sclerosis, Multivariate Analysis, Muscle Strength, Physical Endurance, Resistance Training, Time Factors",
author = "U Dalgas and E Stenager and Jakobsen, {Johannes Klitgaard} and T Petersen and Hansen, {Hans Jacob} and C Knudsen and Kristian Overgaard and T Ingemann-Hansen",
year = "2009",
doi = "10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181bf98b4",
language = "English",
volume = "73",
pages = "1478--84",
journal = "Neurology",
issn = "0028-3878",
publisher = "LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS",
number = "18",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Resistance training improves muscle strength and functional capacity in multiple sclerosis

AU - Dalgas, U

AU - Stenager, E

AU - Jakobsen, Johannes Klitgaard

AU - Petersen, T

AU - Hansen, Hans Jacob

AU - Knudsen, C

AU - Overgaard, Kristian

AU - Ingemann-Hansen, T

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that lower extremity progressive resistance training (PRT) can improve muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to evaluate whether the improvements are maintained after the trial. METHODS: The present study was a 2-arm, 12-week, randomized controlled trial including a poststudy follow-up period of 12 weeks. Thirty-eight moderately impaired patients with MS were randomized to a PRT exercise group (n = 19) or a control group (n = 19). The exercise group completed a biweekly 12-week lower extremity PRT program and was afterward encouraged to continue training. After the trial, the control group completed the PRT intervention. Both groups were tested before and after 12 weeks of the trial and at 24 weeks (follow-up), where isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors (KE MVC) and functional capacity (FS; combined score of 4 tests) were evaluated. RESULTS: KE MVC and FS improved after 12 weeks of PRT in the exercise group (KE MVC: 15.7% [95% confidence interval 4.3-27.0], FS: 21.5% [95% confidence interval 17.0-26.1]; p < 0.05), and the improvements were better than in the control group (p < 0.05). The improvements of KE and FS in the exercise group persisted at follow-up after 24 weeks. Also, the exercise effects were reproduced in the control group during the 12-week posttrial PRT period. CONCLUSIONS: Twelve weeks of intense progressive resistance training of the lower extremities leads to improvements of muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis, the effects persisting after 12 weeks of self-guided physical activity. Level of evidence: The present study provides level III evidence supporting the hypothesis that lower extremity progressive resistance training can improve muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that lower extremity progressive resistance training (PRT) can improve muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to evaluate whether the improvements are maintained after the trial. METHODS: The present study was a 2-arm, 12-week, randomized controlled trial including a poststudy follow-up period of 12 weeks. Thirty-eight moderately impaired patients with MS were randomized to a PRT exercise group (n = 19) or a control group (n = 19). The exercise group completed a biweekly 12-week lower extremity PRT program and was afterward encouraged to continue training. After the trial, the control group completed the PRT intervention. Both groups were tested before and after 12 weeks of the trial and at 24 weeks (follow-up), where isometric muscle strength of the knee extensors (KE MVC) and functional capacity (FS; combined score of 4 tests) were evaluated. RESULTS: KE MVC and FS improved after 12 weeks of PRT in the exercise group (KE MVC: 15.7% [95% confidence interval 4.3-27.0], FS: 21.5% [95% confidence interval 17.0-26.1]; p < 0.05), and the improvements were better than in the control group (p < 0.05). The improvements of KE and FS in the exercise group persisted at follow-up after 24 weeks. Also, the exercise effects were reproduced in the control group during the 12-week posttrial PRT period. CONCLUSIONS: Twelve weeks of intense progressive resistance training of the lower extremities leads to improvements of muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis, the effects persisting after 12 weeks of self-guided physical activity. Level of evidence: The present study provides level III evidence supporting the hypothesis that lower extremity progressive resistance training can improve muscle strength and functional capacity in patients with multiple sclerosis.

KW - Adult

KW - Aged

KW - Analysis of Variance

KW - Denmark

KW - Female

KW - Hand Strength

KW - Humans

KW - Lower Extremity

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Multiple Sclerosis

KW - Multivariate Analysis

KW - Muscle Strength

KW - Physical Endurance

KW - Resistance Training

KW - Time Factors

U2 - 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181bf98b4

DO - 10.1212/WNL.0b013e3181bf98b4

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 19884575

VL - 73

SP - 1478

EP - 1484

JO - Neurology

JF - Neurology

SN - 0028-3878

IS - 18

ER -