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Psychrophilic properties of sulfate-reducing bacteria in Arctic marine sediments

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Microorganisms in the seabed of most of the global oceans live at temperatures close to zero degrees, and in the polar regions even below. Respiration rates of endogenous sulfate-reducing microorganisms in the polar seabed, however, are highest in the range of 18–30°C and much reduced at colder temperature. In the past, this was seen as indicative of poor adaptation to their cold habitat. We challenge this interpretation, and tested which temperature range allowed sulfate reducers to grow, by adding moderate amounts of volatile fatty acids to high-arctic sediment. Initially, sulfate reduction was highest at 27°C in both Svalbard and NE Greenland. But sulfate reduction was not sustainable at this temperature and decreased rapidly over time. Below 26°C, however, sulfate reduction rates increased exponentially over time, indicating growth of sulfate-reducing microorganisms. We used the increase in the sulfate reduction rates over 4 d to calculate potential growth rates of the endogenous sulfate reducers as function of temperature. From growth rates and respiration rates, we could further calculate the growth yield, also as function of temperature. Highest growth rates were observed at 18°C and growth yields peaked at even lower temperatures between 0°C and 10°C. The maximum growth yield at low temperature revealed a strong psychrophilic adaptation of the sulfate reducers in these Arctic sediments. The fact that growth yield was maximized at in situ temperature but maximum potential growth rate was not, is an indication that yield is the more important parameter for microbial competition in marine sediments.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftLimnology and Oceanography
Vol/bind66
NummerS1
Sider (fra-til)S293-S302
ISSN0024-3590
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jan. 2021

Bibliografisk note

Funding Information:
Preben Grann Sørensen, Lars Borregaard Pedersen, Jeanette Pedersen, Karina Bomholt Oest, and Anne Stentebjerg are gratefully acknowledged for technical assistance. We thank cruise leader Marit‐Solveig Seidenkrantz and the captain and crew on board RV  and Stig Henningsen and his crew on board Fram. Camille Brice is gratefully acknowledged for assistance during sampling on board. André Pellerin, Alexander Michaud, and Katja Laufer are thanked for help and feedback during the writing process. This study was funded by the Danish National Research Foundation (grant agreement DNRF104), the European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grant MICROENERGY (grant agreement 294200) and the Heinrich‐Böll‐Stiftung Deutschland. Dana

Funding Information:
Preben Grann S?rensen, Lars Borregaard Pedersen, Jeanette Pedersen, Karina Bomholt Oest, and Anne Stentebjerg are gratefully acknowledged for technical assistance. We thank cruise leader Marit-Solveig Seidenkrantz and the captain and crew on board RV Dana and Stig Henningsen and his crew on board Fram. Camille Brice is gratefully acknowledged for assistance during sampling on board. Andr? Pellerin, Alexander Michaud, and Katja Laufer are thanked for help and feedback during the writing process. This study was funded by the Danish National Research Foundation (grant agreement DNRF104), the European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grant MICROENERGY (grant agreement 294200) and the Heinrich-B?ll-Stiftung Deutschland.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography

Copyright:
Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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