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Priority to organ donors: Personal responsibility, equal access and the priority rule in organ procurement

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Priority to organ donors: Personal responsibility, equal access and the priority rule in organ procurement. / Albertsen, Andreas.

I: Diametros, Bind 51, 2017, s. 137-152.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{e5494b765b3c4b069fce1517dc4647b7,
title = "Priority to organ donors: Personal responsibility, equal access and the priority rule in organ procurement",
abstract = "In the effort to address the persistent organ shortage it is sometimes suggested that we should incentivize people to sign up as organ donors. One way of doing so is to give priority in the allocation of organs to those who are themselves registered as donors. Israel introduced such a scheme recently and the preliminary reports indicate increased donation rates. How should we evaluate such initiatives from an ethical perspective? Luck egalitarianism, a responsibility-sensitive approach to distributive justice, provides one possible justification: Those who decide against being organ donors limit the health care resources available to others. As such, a priority rule can be justified by a luck egalitarian approach to distributive justice. Furthermore, a priority rule inspired by luck egalitarianism is well equipped to avoid prominent criticisms of such a procurement system. Luck egalitarianism provides us with reaons to exempt people who are not responsible for their inability to donate from receiving lower priority, provide sufficient information about donation, and mitigate social and natural circumstances affecting people{\textquoteright}s choice to donate.",
keywords = "luck egalitarianism, luck egalitarianism in health, organ shortage, priority to organ donors, priority rule, Personal responsibility, reciprocity, club model, incentive organ donation, equal access, Israel, organ donation, organ transplantation, distributive justice",
author = "Andreas Albertsen",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "137--152",
journal = "Diametros",
issn = "1733-5566",
publisher = "Institute of Philosophy, Jagiellonian University",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Priority to organ donors: Personal responsibility, equal access and the priority rule in organ procurement

AU - Albertsen, Andreas

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - In the effort to address the persistent organ shortage it is sometimes suggested that we should incentivize people to sign up as organ donors. One way of doing so is to give priority in the allocation of organs to those who are themselves registered as donors. Israel introduced such a scheme recently and the preliminary reports indicate increased donation rates. How should we evaluate such initiatives from an ethical perspective? Luck egalitarianism, a responsibility-sensitive approach to distributive justice, provides one possible justification: Those who decide against being organ donors limit the health care resources available to others. As such, a priority rule can be justified by a luck egalitarian approach to distributive justice. Furthermore, a priority rule inspired by luck egalitarianism is well equipped to avoid prominent criticisms of such a procurement system. Luck egalitarianism provides us with reaons to exempt people who are not responsible for their inability to donate from receiving lower priority, provide sufficient information about donation, and mitigate social and natural circumstances affecting people’s choice to donate.

AB - In the effort to address the persistent organ shortage it is sometimes suggested that we should incentivize people to sign up as organ donors. One way of doing so is to give priority in the allocation of organs to those who are themselves registered as donors. Israel introduced such a scheme recently and the preliminary reports indicate increased donation rates. How should we evaluate such initiatives from an ethical perspective? Luck egalitarianism, a responsibility-sensitive approach to distributive justice, provides one possible justification: Those who decide against being organ donors limit the health care resources available to others. As such, a priority rule can be justified by a luck egalitarian approach to distributive justice. Furthermore, a priority rule inspired by luck egalitarianism is well equipped to avoid prominent criticisms of such a procurement system. Luck egalitarianism provides us with reaons to exempt people who are not responsible for their inability to donate from receiving lower priority, provide sufficient information about donation, and mitigate social and natural circumstances affecting people’s choice to donate.

KW - luck egalitarianism

KW - luck egalitarianism in health

KW - organ shortage

KW - priority to organ donors

KW - priority rule

KW - Personal responsibility

KW - reciprocity

KW - club model

KW - incentive organ donation

KW - equal access

KW - Israel

KW - organ donation

KW - organ transplantation

KW - distributive justice

UR - http://www.diametros.iphils.uj.edu.pl/index.php/diametros/article/download/1035/848

M3 - Journal article

VL - 51

SP - 137

EP - 152

JO - Diametros

JF - Diametros

SN - 1733-5566

ER -