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Potentially bioavailable iron produced through benthic cycling in glaciated Arctic fjords of Svalbard

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Potentially bioavailable iron produced through benthic cycling in glaciated Arctic fjords of Svalbard. / Laufer-Meiser, Katja; Michaud, Alexander B.; Maisch, Markus; Byrne, James M.; Kappler, Andreas; Patterson, Molly O.; Røy, Hans; Jørgensen, Bo Barker.

I: Nature Communications, Bind 12, Nr. 1, 1349, 03.2021.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

Laufer-Meiser, K, Michaud, AB, Maisch, M, Byrne, JM, Kappler, A, Patterson, MO, Røy, H & Jørgensen, BB 2021, 'Potentially bioavailable iron produced through benthic cycling in glaciated Arctic fjords of Svalbard', Nature Communications, bind 12, nr. 1, 1349. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-21558-w

APA

Laufer-Meiser, K., Michaud, A. B., Maisch, M., Byrne, J. M., Kappler, A., Patterson, M. O., Røy, H., & Jørgensen, B. B. (2021). Potentially bioavailable iron produced through benthic cycling in glaciated Arctic fjords of Svalbard. Nature Communications, 12(1), [1349]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-21558-w

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MLA

Vancouver

Laufer-Meiser K, Michaud AB, Maisch M, Byrne JM, Kappler A, Patterson MO o.a. Potentially bioavailable iron produced through benthic cycling in glaciated Arctic fjords of Svalbard. Nature Communications. 2021 mar;12(1). 1349. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-021-21558-w

Author

Laufer-Meiser, Katja ; Michaud, Alexander B. ; Maisch, Markus ; Byrne, James M. ; Kappler, Andreas ; Patterson, Molly O. ; Røy, Hans ; Jørgensen, Bo Barker. / Potentially bioavailable iron produced through benthic cycling in glaciated Arctic fjords of Svalbard. I: Nature Communications. 2021 ; Bind 12, Nr. 1.

Bibtex

@article{fb45d5774288450b88638582b8c12425,
title = "Potentially bioavailable iron produced through benthic cycling in glaciated Arctic fjords of Svalbard",
abstract = "The Arctic has the highest warming rates on Earth. Glaciated fjord ecosystems, which are hotspots of carbon cycling and burial, are extremely sensitive to this warming. Glaciers are important for the transport of iron from land to sea and supply this essential nutrient to phytoplankton in high-latitude marine ecosystems. However, up to 95% of the glacially-sourced iron settles to sediments close to the glacial source. Our data show that while 0.6–12% of the total glacially-sourced iron is potentially bioavailable, biogeochemical cycling in Arctic fjord sediments converts the glacially-derived iron into more labile phases, generating up to a 9-fold increase in the amount of potentially bioavailable iron. Arctic fjord sediments are thus an important source of potentially bioavailable iron. However, our data suggests that as glaciers retreat onto land the flux of iron to the sediment-water interface may be reduced. Glacial retreat therefore likely impacts iron cycling in coastal marine ecosystems.",
author = "Katja Laufer-Meiser and Michaud, {Alexander B.} and Markus Maisch and Byrne, {James M.} and Andreas Kappler and Patterson, {Molly O.} and Hans R{\o}y and J{\o}rgensen, {Bo Barker}",
year = "2021",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1038/s41467-021-21558-w",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "Nature Communications",
issn = "2041-1723",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potentially bioavailable iron produced through benthic cycling in glaciated Arctic fjords of Svalbard

AU - Laufer-Meiser, Katja

AU - Michaud, Alexander B.

AU - Maisch, Markus

AU - Byrne, James M.

AU - Kappler, Andreas

AU - Patterson, Molly O.

AU - Røy, Hans

AU - Jørgensen, Bo Barker

PY - 2021/3

Y1 - 2021/3

N2 - The Arctic has the highest warming rates on Earth. Glaciated fjord ecosystems, which are hotspots of carbon cycling and burial, are extremely sensitive to this warming. Glaciers are important for the transport of iron from land to sea and supply this essential nutrient to phytoplankton in high-latitude marine ecosystems. However, up to 95% of the glacially-sourced iron settles to sediments close to the glacial source. Our data show that while 0.6–12% of the total glacially-sourced iron is potentially bioavailable, biogeochemical cycling in Arctic fjord sediments converts the glacially-derived iron into more labile phases, generating up to a 9-fold increase in the amount of potentially bioavailable iron. Arctic fjord sediments are thus an important source of potentially bioavailable iron. However, our data suggests that as glaciers retreat onto land the flux of iron to the sediment-water interface may be reduced. Glacial retreat therefore likely impacts iron cycling in coastal marine ecosystems.

AB - The Arctic has the highest warming rates on Earth. Glaciated fjord ecosystems, which are hotspots of carbon cycling and burial, are extremely sensitive to this warming. Glaciers are important for the transport of iron from land to sea and supply this essential nutrient to phytoplankton in high-latitude marine ecosystems. However, up to 95% of the glacially-sourced iron settles to sediments close to the glacial source. Our data show that while 0.6–12% of the total glacially-sourced iron is potentially bioavailable, biogeochemical cycling in Arctic fjord sediments converts the glacially-derived iron into more labile phases, generating up to a 9-fold increase in the amount of potentially bioavailable iron. Arctic fjord sediments are thus an important source of potentially bioavailable iron. However, our data suggests that as glaciers retreat onto land the flux of iron to the sediment-water interface may be reduced. Glacial retreat therefore likely impacts iron cycling in coastal marine ecosystems.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85101824540&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41467-021-21558-w

DO - 10.1038/s41467-021-21558-w

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33649339

AN - SCOPUS:85101824540

VL - 12

JO - Nature Communications

JF - Nature Communications

SN - 2041-1723

IS - 1

M1 - 1349

ER -