Possible Modifiers of the Association Between Change in Weight Status From Child Through Adult Ages and Later Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

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DOI

  • Lise G Bjerregaard, Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Universitets Hospital, Danmark
  • Niko Wasenius, University of Helsinki, Medical Clinic, Helsinki University Hospital, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland
  • Rozenn Nedelec, University of Oulu, Finland
  • Line K Gjærde, Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Universitets Hospital, Danmark
  • Lars Ängquist, Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Universitets Hospital, Københavns Universitet, Danmark
  • Karl-Heinz Herzig, University of Oulu, Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Polen
  • Gorm B Jensen, Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Universitets Hospital, Danmark
  • Erik L Mortensen, Københavns Universitet, Danmark
  • Merete Osler, Københavns Universitet, Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Universitets Hospital
  • ,
  • Kim Overvad
  • Tea Skaaby, Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Universitets Hospital, Danmark
  • Anne Tjønneland, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Københavns Universitet, Danmark
  • Thorkild I A Sørensen, Københavns Universitet, Danmark
  • Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, University of Oulu, Imperial College London, Brunel University London, Storbritannien
  • Johan G Eriksson, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, Agency for Science, Technology, and Research, Singapore., University of Helsinki, Medical Clinic, Helsinki University Hospital, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Sylvain Sebert, University of Oulu, Imperial College London, Storbritannien
  • Jennifer L Baker, Københavns Universitet, Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Universitets Hospital, Danmark

OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between changes in weight status from childhood through adulthood and subsequent type 2 diabetes risks and whether educational attainment, smoking, and leisure time physical activity (LTPA) modify this association.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Using data from 10 Danish and Finnish cohorts including 25,283 individuals, childhood BMI at 7 and 12 years was categorized as normal or high using age- and sex-specific cutoffs (<85th or ≥85th percentile). Adult BMI (20-71 years) was categorized as nonobese or obese (<30.0 or ≥30.0 kg/m2, respectively). Associations between BMI patterns and type 2 diabetes (989 women and 1,370 men) were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard regressions and meta-analysis techniques.

RESULTS: Compared with individuals with a normal BMI at 7 years and without adult obesity, those with a high BMI at 7 years and adult obesity had higher type 2 diabetes risks (hazard ratio [HR]girls: 5.04 [95% CI 3.92-6.48]; HRboys: 3.78 [95% CI 2.68-5.33]). Individuals with a high BMI at 7 years but without adult obesity did not have a higher risk (HRgirls: 0.74 [95% CI 0.52-1.06]; HRboys: 0.93 [95% CI 0.65-1.33]). Education, smoking, and LTPA were associated with diabetes risks, but did not modify or confound the associations with BMI changes. Results for 12 years of age were similar.

CONCLUSIONS: A high BMI in childhood was associated with higher type 2 diabetes risks only if individuals also had obesity in adulthood. These associations were not influenced by educational and lifestyle factors, indicating that BMI is similarly related to the risk across all levels of these factors.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDiabetes Care
Vol/bind43
Nummer5
Sider (fra-til)1000-1007
Antal sider8
ISSN0149-5992
DOI
StatusUdgivet - apr. 2020

Bibliografisk note

© 2020 by the American Diabetes Association.

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