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Polyrhythmic communicational devices appear as languagein the brains of musicians

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Polyrhythmic communicational devices appear as languagein the brains of musicians. / Vuust, Peter; Østergaard, Leif; Roepstorff, Andreas.

ICMPC9 - International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition. ESCOM, 2006.

Publikation: Bidrag til bog/antologi/rapport/proceedingKonferencebidrag i proceedingsForskningpeer review

Harvard

Vuust, P, Østergaard, L & Roepstorff, A 2006, Polyrhythmic communicational devices appear as languagein the brains of musicians. i ICMPC9 - International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition. ESCOM, ICMPC9 - International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition 9 - Bologna, Bologna, 17/12/2010.

APA

Vuust, P., Østergaard, L., & Roepstorff, A. (2006). Polyrhythmic communicational devices appear as languagein the brains of musicians. I ICMPC9 - International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition ESCOM.

CBE

Vuust P, Østergaard L, Roepstorff A. 2006. Polyrhythmic communicational devices appear as languagein the brains of musicians. I ICMPC9 - International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition. ESCOM.

MLA

Vancouver

Vuust P, Østergaard L, Roepstorff A. Polyrhythmic communicational devices appear as languagein the brains of musicians. I ICMPC9 - International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition. ESCOM. 2006

Author

Bibtex

@inproceedings{ae08dbe0812911dbbee902004c4f4f50,
title = "Polyrhythmic communicational devices appear as languagein the brains of musicians",
abstract = "The relationship between music and language has been oneof the most fiercely debated subjects in the modern literatureof neuroscience and music. In this paper we argue thata musicological study of the online communication betweenjazz musicians in combination with brain imaging studiesoffers a unique setting to evaluate communicational aspectsof music practices that rarely enters the present discourseon the subject. We employ Miles Davis' quintet of the1960es and its use of polyrhythmic structures as a generalexample of a jazz group focusing on communication. First,we consider jazz in the light of Roman Jakobson's model ofcommunication in a broad perspective. Next, we analyzepolyrhythmic occurrences in Herbie Hancock´s solo on thejazz standard {"}All of You{"} as an example of how this communicationdevelops as a narrative structuring of tensionand relief. Finally, we show how polyrhythmic structuresemploy brain areas, hitherto associated with linguistic semanticprocessing and discuss possible implications of this result.",
author = "Peter Vuust and Leif {\O}stergaard and Andreas Roepstorff",
year = "2006",
language = "English",
isbn = "ISBN 88-7395-155-4",
booktitle = "ICMPC9 - International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition",
publisher = "ESCOM",
note = "null ; Conference date: 17-12-2010",

}

RIS

TY - GEN

T1 - Polyrhythmic communicational devices appear as languagein the brains of musicians

AU - Vuust, Peter

AU - Østergaard, Leif

AU - Roepstorff, Andreas

N1 - Conference code: 9

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - The relationship between music and language has been oneof the most fiercely debated subjects in the modern literatureof neuroscience and music. In this paper we argue thata musicological study of the online communication betweenjazz musicians in combination with brain imaging studiesoffers a unique setting to evaluate communicational aspectsof music practices that rarely enters the present discourseon the subject. We employ Miles Davis' quintet of the1960es and its use of polyrhythmic structures as a generalexample of a jazz group focusing on communication. First,we consider jazz in the light of Roman Jakobson's model ofcommunication in a broad perspective. Next, we analyzepolyrhythmic occurrences in Herbie Hancock´s solo on thejazz standard "All of You" as an example of how this communicationdevelops as a narrative structuring of tensionand relief. Finally, we show how polyrhythmic structuresemploy brain areas, hitherto associated with linguistic semanticprocessing and discuss possible implications of this result.

AB - The relationship between music and language has been oneof the most fiercely debated subjects in the modern literatureof neuroscience and music. In this paper we argue thata musicological study of the online communication betweenjazz musicians in combination with brain imaging studiesoffers a unique setting to evaluate communicational aspectsof music practices that rarely enters the present discourseon the subject. We employ Miles Davis' quintet of the1960es and its use of polyrhythmic structures as a generalexample of a jazz group focusing on communication. First,we consider jazz in the light of Roman Jakobson's model ofcommunication in a broad perspective. Next, we analyzepolyrhythmic occurrences in Herbie Hancock´s solo on thejazz standard "All of You" as an example of how this communicationdevelops as a narrative structuring of tensionand relief. Finally, we show how polyrhythmic structuresemploy brain areas, hitherto associated with linguistic semanticprocessing and discuss possible implications of this result.

M3 - Article in proceedings

SN - ISBN 88-7395-155-4

BT - ICMPC9 - International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition

PB - ESCOM

Y2 - 17 December 2010

ER -