Patients' and Health Professionals' Experiences of Group Training to Increase Intensity of Training after Acquired Brain Injury: A Focus Group Study

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Patients' and Health Professionals' Experiences of Group Training to Increase Intensity of Training after Acquired Brain Injury : A Focus Group Study. / Hansen, Gunhild Mo; Brunner, Iris; Pallesen, Hanne.

I: Rehabilitation Research and Practice, Bind 2021, 8838038, 01.2021.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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@article{1cb36314da424964b41d8c602efbb734,
title = "Patients' and Health Professionals' Experiences of Group Training to Increase Intensity of Training after Acquired Brain Injury: A Focus Group Study",
abstract = "Background. Increased intensity of training in the subacute phase after acquired brain injury facilitates plasticity and enhances better function. Group training can be a motivating factor and an effective means of increasing intensity. Reports on patients' and health care professionals' experiences on increasing the amount of active practice through group training during in-patient rehabilitation after acquired brain injury have been limited. Methods. Two focus groups, patients and health care professionals, participated each in two interviews, before and after implementation of the Activity block, i.e., 2-hour daily intensive group training. The data from the interviews were analyzed from a phenomenological perspective. Results. Three categories emerged from the data analyzes (i) training intensity, (ii) motivation and meaningfulness, and (iii) expectations and concerns. Both groups experienced that the training after implementation of the Activity block had become more intense and that motivation was increased induced by the group setting. Also, both groups found self-management enhanced. Some challenges were also reported. Patients expressed concerns to finding a balance between rest and activity, while the health professionals mentioned practical challenges, i.e., planning the content of the day and finding their role in the Activity block. Conclusion. Activity block benefitted a heterogeneous group of patients with acquired brain injury and was perceived as an overall positive experience by patients and health personnel. Matching the training to the individuals' need for support, finding a balance between rest and activity and using tasks that support patients' motivation, appeared important. ",
author = "Hansen, {Gunhild Mo} and Iris Brunner and Hanne Pallesen",
note = "Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} 2021 Gunhild Mo Hansen et al. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
doi = "10.1155/2021/8838038",
language = "English",
volume = "2021",
journal = "Rehabilitation Research and Practice",
issn = "2090-2867",
publisher = "Hindawi Publishing Corporation",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patients' and Health Professionals' Experiences of Group Training to Increase Intensity of Training after Acquired Brain Injury

T2 - A Focus Group Study

AU - Hansen, Gunhild Mo

AU - Brunner, Iris

AU - Pallesen, Hanne

N1 - Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Gunhild Mo Hansen et al. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/1

Y1 - 2021/1

N2 - Background. Increased intensity of training in the subacute phase after acquired brain injury facilitates plasticity and enhances better function. Group training can be a motivating factor and an effective means of increasing intensity. Reports on patients' and health care professionals' experiences on increasing the amount of active practice through group training during in-patient rehabilitation after acquired brain injury have been limited. Methods. Two focus groups, patients and health care professionals, participated each in two interviews, before and after implementation of the Activity block, i.e., 2-hour daily intensive group training. The data from the interviews were analyzed from a phenomenological perspective. Results. Three categories emerged from the data analyzes (i) training intensity, (ii) motivation and meaningfulness, and (iii) expectations and concerns. Both groups experienced that the training after implementation of the Activity block had become more intense and that motivation was increased induced by the group setting. Also, both groups found self-management enhanced. Some challenges were also reported. Patients expressed concerns to finding a balance between rest and activity, while the health professionals mentioned practical challenges, i.e., planning the content of the day and finding their role in the Activity block. Conclusion. Activity block benefitted a heterogeneous group of patients with acquired brain injury and was perceived as an overall positive experience by patients and health personnel. Matching the training to the individuals' need for support, finding a balance between rest and activity and using tasks that support patients' motivation, appeared important.

AB - Background. Increased intensity of training in the subacute phase after acquired brain injury facilitates plasticity and enhances better function. Group training can be a motivating factor and an effective means of increasing intensity. Reports on patients' and health care professionals' experiences on increasing the amount of active practice through group training during in-patient rehabilitation after acquired brain injury have been limited. Methods. Two focus groups, patients and health care professionals, participated each in two interviews, before and after implementation of the Activity block, i.e., 2-hour daily intensive group training. The data from the interviews were analyzed from a phenomenological perspective. Results. Three categories emerged from the data analyzes (i) training intensity, (ii) motivation and meaningfulness, and (iii) expectations and concerns. Both groups experienced that the training after implementation of the Activity block had become more intense and that motivation was increased induced by the group setting. Also, both groups found self-management enhanced. Some challenges were also reported. Patients expressed concerns to finding a balance between rest and activity, while the health professionals mentioned practical challenges, i.e., planning the content of the day and finding their role in the Activity block. Conclusion. Activity block benefitted a heterogeneous group of patients with acquired brain injury and was perceived as an overall positive experience by patients and health personnel. Matching the training to the individuals' need for support, finding a balance between rest and activity and using tasks that support patients' motivation, appeared important.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85100147824&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1155/2021/8838038

DO - 10.1155/2021/8838038

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33505728

AN - SCOPUS:85100147824

VL - 2021

JO - Rehabilitation Research and Practice

JF - Rehabilitation Research and Practice

SN - 2090-2867

M1 - 8838038

ER -