Oral health and Brain Injury: Causal or Casual Relation? Oral health and acquired brain injury

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisReviewForskningpeer review

Standard

Oral health and Brain Injury: Causal or Casual Relation? Oral health and acquired brain injury. / Pillai, Rajath; Iyer, Kiran; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Futarmal Kothari, Simple; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk; Kothari, Mohit.

I: Cerebrovascular Diseases, Bind 8, 09.01.2018, s. 1-15.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskrift/Konferencebidrag i tidsskrift /Bidrag til avisReviewForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{056928c04bf344d2960cdd66e29dd8a1,
title = "Oral health and Brain Injury: Causal or Casual Relation?: Oral health and acquired brain injury",
abstract = "Background: To systematically review the current literature investigating the association between oral health and acquired brain injury.Methods: A structured search strategy was applied to PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and CENTRAL electronic databases until March 2017 by two independent reviewers. The preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis guidelines were used for systematic review. Results: Even though the objective was to assess the association between oral health and acquired brain injury, eligible studies focused solely on different forms of stroke and stroke subtypes. Stroke prediction was associated with various factors such as number of teeth, periodontal conditions (even after controlling for confounding factors), clinical attachment loss, antibody levels to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Prevotella intermedia. The literature showed no consensus on the possible association between gingivitis and stroke. Patients with stroke generally had poorer oral hygiene practices and oral health. Dental prophylaxis and professional intervention reduced the incidence of stroke. Conclusions: Overall, oral health and stroke were related. Periodontitis and tooth loss were independently associated with stroke. However, prevention and timely intervention can reduce the risk of stroke. Stroke was the main cerebral lesion studied in the literature, with almost no publications on other brain lesions.",
keywords = "Brain injury, Oral Hygiene, ASSOCIATION, Cerebrovascular Disorders, Periodontitis, oro-dental condition",
author = "Rajath Pillai and Kiran Iyer and Rubens Spin-Neto and {Futarmal Kothari}, Simple and Nielsen, {J{\o}rgen Feldb{\ae}k} and Mohit Kothari",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "9",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "1--15",
journal = "Cerebrovascular Diseases",
issn = "1015-9770",
publisher = "S. Karger AG",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Oral health and Brain Injury: Causal or Casual Relation?

T2 - Oral health and acquired brain injury

AU - Pillai, Rajath

AU - Iyer, Kiran

AU - Spin-Neto, Rubens

AU - Futarmal Kothari, Simple

AU - Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbæk

AU - Kothari, Mohit

PY - 2018/1/9

Y1 - 2018/1/9

N2 - Background: To systematically review the current literature investigating the association between oral health and acquired brain injury.Methods: A structured search strategy was applied to PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and CENTRAL electronic databases until March 2017 by two independent reviewers. The preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis guidelines were used for systematic review. Results: Even though the objective was to assess the association between oral health and acquired brain injury, eligible studies focused solely on different forms of stroke and stroke subtypes. Stroke prediction was associated with various factors such as number of teeth, periodontal conditions (even after controlling for confounding factors), clinical attachment loss, antibody levels to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Prevotella intermedia. The literature showed no consensus on the possible association between gingivitis and stroke. Patients with stroke generally had poorer oral hygiene practices and oral health. Dental prophylaxis and professional intervention reduced the incidence of stroke. Conclusions: Overall, oral health and stroke were related. Periodontitis and tooth loss were independently associated with stroke. However, prevention and timely intervention can reduce the risk of stroke. Stroke was the main cerebral lesion studied in the literature, with almost no publications on other brain lesions.

AB - Background: To systematically review the current literature investigating the association between oral health and acquired brain injury.Methods: A structured search strategy was applied to PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and CENTRAL electronic databases until March 2017 by two independent reviewers. The preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis guidelines were used for systematic review. Results: Even though the objective was to assess the association between oral health and acquired brain injury, eligible studies focused solely on different forms of stroke and stroke subtypes. Stroke prediction was associated with various factors such as number of teeth, periodontal conditions (even after controlling for confounding factors), clinical attachment loss, antibody levels to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Prevotella intermedia. The literature showed no consensus on the possible association between gingivitis and stroke. Patients with stroke generally had poorer oral hygiene practices and oral health. Dental prophylaxis and professional intervention reduced the incidence of stroke. Conclusions: Overall, oral health and stroke were related. Periodontitis and tooth loss were independently associated with stroke. However, prevention and timely intervention can reduce the risk of stroke. Stroke was the main cerebral lesion studied in the literature, with almost no publications on other brain lesions.

KW - Brain injury

KW - Oral Hygiene

KW - ASSOCIATION

KW - Cerebrovascular Disorders

KW - Periodontitis

KW - oro-dental condition

M3 - Review

VL - 8

SP - 1

EP - 15

JO - Cerebrovascular Diseases

JF - Cerebrovascular Diseases

SN - 1015-9770

ER -